However, because the Belgian Blue stone generally occurs in relatively wide columns with much thinner layers of Vielsalm Coticule on either side adjacent to the slate, the Belgian Blue stone is more plentiful that Coticule and thus, it’s somewhat less expensive. But, it’s also somewhat softer than Coticule and is not divided into different grades as Coticule is. Furthermore, because it is a softer stone than Coticule, it is sold without a substrate layer.
The answer to the question of how to choose a single whetstone from among the many is actually one of both purpose and expense. Indeed, as the old adage says: “You get what you pay for” – This is certainly the case with sharpening stones. In fact, as a general rule, a high quality, natural, whetstone is significantly more expensive than a man-made whetstone but, they also tend to produce a noticeably finer edge than man-made stones do. On the other hand, man-made whetstones (with the exception of diamond hones) are very affordable and, just like natural whetstones, they too are available in different grits for different stages in the sharpening process from cutting the initial edge bevel to polishing a finely honed edge.
I purchased this set together with the 400/1000 grit stone assuming that some of my knives were quite dull and would need work on a coarse grit stone. Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000 | Knife Sharpener Waterstone with NonSlip Rubber Base & Flattening Stone. This is my first wetstone. First off I tried to sharpen my Chicago Cutlery boning knife. This knife is nearly thirty years old, has been abused in may ways and was quite dull. It was very difficult for me to get a burr on this blade, which I attribute to poor technique. Next I moved on to my Henckels Professional S paring and chef's knives. The paring knife was moderately sharp and was modestly improved after working over all three grits of stone. It would cut paper but again it was difficult to develop a burr with this blade. Undaunted I switched to the chef's knife. This knife is twenty years old and has never been professionally re-sharpened. I have sharpened it twice with a Lanksey sharpening system which marred the finish but did put a good edge on the blade. Lansky Standard Coarse Sharpening System with Fine Hones. The chef's knife was moderately dull and had several pits visible on the cutting surface. I modified my technique for passing the knife over the stone and worked the chef's knife over the 400 grit stone aggressively and eventually I was able to get a burr to form from the tip of the knife all the way to the handle. From there it was a simple process of reforming the burr on the 1000 grit stone and then finishing on the 6000. After sharpening, the chef's knife easily and cleanly slices a tomato with very light pressure and is in my opinion very sharp. Not sushi knife sharp but more than enough for the chopping and slicing I expect of it. I'm looking forward to going back and working both the boning knife and the paring knife over again. Don't expect a good result from this product the first time you use it. Watch videos on using a wetstone, expect to spend at least twenty minutes per knife at first, and practice forming a burr. If you can form a burr, you will be able to successfully sharpen your knife.
Ease of use – Most people in search of a mechanical sharpener want one because they don’t want to be bothered with trying to achieve a perfect edge themselves using a stick or sharpening stone. They want predictable, first class results every time. In that case it’s important that the electric powered device is easy to use, achieves results quickly and with little effort and is designed with user safety in mind. Keep in mind too that it’s easy to apply too much pressure when using a mechanical sharpener and when that happens you’re likely to see unsatisfactory results. In addition there are subtle differences between mechanical devices designed for Asian-style knives and those designed for Western-style knives. This has to do with the sharpening angle discussed above. Don’t get an Asian sharpener if you don’t need precise control over your cuts.
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If you do not remove enough metal to create a new edge, you will leave some of the dull edge in place. A dull blade (or a blade with dull spots or nicks) will reflect light from the very edge of the blade. A razor sharp knife edge will not show "bright spots" when you hold it blade up under a bright light. You will need to remove enough material from the sides of the bevel so that the edge stops reflecting light.

The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.


With its premium series Select II, the whetstone manufacturer Sigma Power Corporation from Tokyo addresses users of high-alloy steels such as HSS. These stones, too, are obviously intended to engender a grinding experience similar to that of natural stones. The special production process is expensive, but the Sigma Select II probably has no equal when it comes to demolishing steel.
A great sharpener for all your kitchen knives the CS2 also makes a smart addition to the gear when you’re going away on a family camping trip. It will also do a bang-up job on your hunting, pocket, boning knife and more. As mentioned it does require just a bit of getting used to in order to achieve optimal results but nothing too involved. A simple, effective, no-frills sharpener.
Why, then, do so many of us shy away from the task? To put it bluntly, it's because it's a rather daunting process for the beginner. Your image of knife sharpening may consist of a hyper-masculine chef slashing away violently at a steel rod (we're looking at you, Gordon). Conversely, you might have seen cooks meticulously and methodically stroking their blade up and down a Japanese waterstone with more intricate attention to detail than a Flemish landscape. 
first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg
A: When it comes to the best knife sharpeners used in a domestic setting the abrasives used to sharpen the blade should last for quite a few years. When they do eventually wear out many of the best manufacturers will refurbish them for you, typically for a nominal fee. Again, however, unless you are using the sharpener on a daily basis (and there is virtually no reason the average person would do this), the sharpener should last for many years before ever needing service.

I'm a novice knife sharpener. I've had to unlearn what my grandpa taught me in order to use these. So far, I've had decent but mixed results. I've switched to my cheap 200/400-ish cheap tool stone from harbor freight for cutting a bevel when the blade has either been damaged or did not have a proper bevel. The 400/1000 grit stone in this kit is soft. Very soft. I have bowled it out several times. It makes keeping a steady angle difficult. But these stones at this price point are meant for learning, and for that they serve their purpose.

A: For many years there was a heated debate around this topic with manufacturer’s stating flatly the notion their products actually damaged knives was absurd, and many professional chefs claiming not only was it not absurd, it was common for mechanical sharpeners to damage expensive cutlery. So who was right? To a certain extent they both were. The manufacturers were correct in asserting that if you followed the instructions to the letter there was little if any chance your knives would be damaged. However, in reality few people actually followed the instructions to the letter and when they veered from the recommended course the potential was there for damage.
A diamond plate is a steel plate, sometimes mounted on a plastic or resin base, coated with diamond grit, an abrasive that will grind metal. When they are mounted they are sometimes known as diamond stones.[12] The plate may have a series of holes cut in it that capture the swarf cast off as grinding takes place, and cuts costs by reducing the amount of abrasive surface area on each plate. Diamond plates can serve many purposes including sharpening steel tools, and for maintaining the flatness of man-made waterstones, which can become grooved or hollowed in use. Truing (flattening a stone whose shape has been changed as it wears away) is widely considered essential to the sharpening process but some hand sharpening techniques utilise the high points of a non-true stone. As the only part of a diamond plate to wear away is a very thin coating of grit and adhesive, and in a good diamond plate this wear is minimal due to diamond's hardness, a diamond plate retains its flatness. Rubbing the diamond plate on a whetstone to true (flatten) the whetstone is a modern alternative to more traditional truing methods.[13]
Choose the style of stone. You'll need to choose a natural or synthetic stone that can be used wet (soaked in water), with oil, or dry. There are also diamond stones that are actually very small diamonds attached to a metal surface. Stones that are soaked in water are softer stones which means you can quickly sharpen your knives. Unfortunately, these stones will wear down faster than the others. Oil stones are the least expensive and they're made of a harder material.[2]
Manufacturer contacted and sent a new one for replacement. Great customer service but replacement item was nicked on the corner. It was still usable so i didn't bother to ask for another replacement. I would recommend item to be shipped in another box instead of an over-sized yellow envelop which is not adequate protection. Item sharpen my knife pretty good though..

The 8,000 grit Kitayama is definitely a popular 8K stone, it is my favourite, and the feedback has much to do with that. It is silky smooth and feels creamy when you use it. When reaching refinement levels of 6k and above, polished bevels/edge are inevitable, and often sought after. The level of polish from this particular stone is very beautiful, assuming that you have done some refinement prior to this but it is a wonderful 8,000 grit stone.

A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife. 

One of the most well-regarded natural whetstones is the yellow-gray "Belgian Coticule", which has been legendary for the edge it can give to blades since Roman times, and has been quarried for centuries from the Ardennes. The slightly coarser and more plentiful "Belgian Blue" whetstone is found naturally with the yellow coticule in adjacent strata; hence two-sided whetstones are available, with a naturally occurring seam between the yellow and blue layers. These are highly prized for their natural elegance and beauty, and for providing both a fast-cutting surface for establishing a bevel and a finer surface for refining it. This stone is considered one of the finest for sharpening straight razors.[citation needed]


This is a great sharpener for budget conscious cooks. You can use it with equal facility whether you’re right or left handed, it has a convenient finger guard to cut down on accidents and most important, it only takes a few swipes on a regular basis to keep your knives in tip-top condition. It’s not glamorous. It won’t add anything substantive to your kitchen decor. But it will ensure your knives are always ready for whatever dish you have in mind.
Oil Stones differ from water stones in that they require the use of honing oil to float the swarf (metal particles). Also, these stones are commonly made from one of three different materials consisting of Novaculite, Aluminum Oxide (Corundum), or Silicon Carbide (Carborundum) and they all use oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf in order to prevent the stone from becoming clogged. Also, while Novaculite and Coticule are the most traditional types of oil stones, there are also synthetic oil stones made by the Norton abrasives company called “India Oil Stones”.

Table mounted device – Typically the manual powered table mounted sharpener looks virtually identical to the electric powered sharpener with a slot for each stage. Where they differ is that each slot in the manual powered sharpener has only one groove and you pull the blade through this groove toward you to sharpen the blade. Once the blade is sufficiently sharp you place it in the honing groove to refine the edge and pull it toward you again several times. If there is a third, cleaning, stage you repeat the process for that stage as well.


1. Diamond Stones. I’ve used two, many years ago, to sharpen steel knives & found that the diamond coating wore away. They did work well at first, but then I was sharpening on the backing material. This puzzled me, because diamond is harder than steel, but have only recently read that the diamond particles are torn off the backing material because they stick to the softer steel. Diamond stones are recommended for sharpening ceramic knives only. This info about diamond stones & steel knives I got from an Edge-Pro article.
We’re happy to present something everyone has been waiting for – a combination diamond/ceramic whetstone that will handle all your sharpening needs. The newly-developed DC3 and DC4 whetstones consist of a fine diamond stone (25 micron) and a very special ceramic stone, made of synthetic sapphires. The advantage of these materials, although they get worn, will still keep their flat shape this is important when you sharpen your knife. And, since these materials are the hardest we know of, they will sharpen any steel, even these extremely hard powder steels. You don’t need any lubrication for these stone but now and then you should consider cleaning them with warm water and liquid soap. The stones might feel coarse from the start but will become smoother/better after some use. A leather pouch is included.
The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).

Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
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We’re happy to present something everyone has been waiting for – a combination diamond/ceramic whetstone that will handle all your sharpening needs. The newly-developed DC3 and DC4 whetstones consist of a fine diamond stone (25 micron) and a very special ceramic stone, made of synthetic sapphires. The advantage of these materials, although they get worn, will still keep their flat shape this is important when you sharpen your knife. And, since these materials are the hardest we know of, they will sharpen any steel, even these extremely hard powder steels. You don’t need any lubrication for these stone but now and then you should consider cleaning them with warm water and liquid soap. The stones might feel coarse from the start but will become smoother/better after some use. A leather pouch is included.

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Your task as a sharpener is to remove that fatigued metal and expose the steel underneath, the fresh strong steel and bring side A and B of the knife together at the Apex precisely, sounds easy doesn’t it? Like peeling a layer off and having a fresh start, over and over. Of course there is much more to it than this but in very basic terms, you want the abrasive properties of the water stone to abrade the fatigued metal away, like an eraser.

The humble sharpener tends to elicit more divergent opinions than just about any other type of kitchen tech. Everyone, it turns out, has their own take on which type of sharpener works best and why and most serious chefs aren’t shy about voicing their opinion. As you can imagine then there are a number of things most chefs – both professional and amateur – look for in a sharpener in order to ensure they get the one that’s right for them. These considerations include:
Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
Selecting the proper coarseness for your sharpening stone is an important first step in sharpening your knife. Not every knife needs to start at the coarsest stone you have, on the other hand a very dull knife can not be sharpened on only your finest stone. Starting with the proper coarseness will ensure that you achieve the edge you need quickly. If your knife is very dull or has a nicked blade, start with your coarsest stone. The coarse stone removes material quickly so a poor edge can be refined quickly. However, the coarse stone must be followed up with your finer stone to refine the edge. If your knife is only slightly dull and just needs a quick touch up, starting at a medium or fine stone can save you time. Starting on a fine stone requires fewer steps but must only be used on an edge requiring little work.

Unfortunately, the arrays of modern whetstone can be bewildering to the inexperienced sharpeners that so often times many of them end up with a crap or wrong decision on stone type for their utensils. The most difficult to determine is whether the whetstone is fake or fabricated with low quality of materials. To avoid this you can only go for the reliable brand of a whetstone.


A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.
You will be given access to our useful online learning material: a set of videos and articles to help you improve your sharpening technique. These resources were made by professional knife sharpeners, specifically for beginners and intermediate sharpeners. The articles and videos will guide you and teach you knife sharpening from scratch, also covering more advanced techniques. You can also get in touch with us anytime if you have any questions concerning sharpening specific types knives.
These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
Cutting angle – With a manual stick or sharpening stone you set the angle yourself so this does not factor into the equation when choosing that type of sharpener. When shopping for an electric sharpener however it does. You’ll want to decide if you want your knives to have the 15 degree “Asian” style angle so that you can make precise cuts or the Western standard 20 degrees or 22-degree sharpening angle. Most people will opt for the 20 or 22-degree angle simply because their cuisine doesn’t call for a lot of finesse from their knives and those knives are probably of a heavier Western variety anyway.
The composition of the stone affects the sharpness of the blade (a finer grain, usually, though not always, produces sharper blades), as does the composition of the blade (some metals take and keep an edge better than others). For example, Western kitchen knives are usually made of softer steel and take an edge angle of 20–22°, while East Asian kitchen knives are traditionally of harder steel and take an edge angle of 15–18°. The Western-style kitchen knives are generally in the range of 52–58 on the Rockwell scale, which denotes the relative hardness of a material.

To take off the fine scratches and burrs left by coarser stones, and to polish the surface, you can use stones starting at around 2000 grit. There is theoretically no upper limit, but stones above about 10000 grit achieve practically no measurable improvement in the edge. It is also interesting to note that above 8000 grit, there is no Japanese measurement standard. For stones labelled as having a finer grit, you simply have to take the manufacturer's word for it.

The coarse stone will cut the metal off quicker but it is going to give you a rougher edge but that way the job gets done quicker, without the oil. It is not as messy. This is just a real simple set up. If you do wood work you can make a little wooden box and rout it out. In this particular case it is just a 2x4, stone traced out, finishing nails tapped down so they are deeper than the stone so when you drop the stone in, if you are at a workbench you can C-clamp it down in place or you can hold on to it.

We have been helping customers find the right sharpeners for more than a decade. Selecting a sharpener can be difficult if you're not sure what you need. Our staff is trained to listen to your needs and to help you find the right sharpener the first time. We understand that it may be your first time sharpening, so we're available to help you if you have questions. Even if you're already a sharpening professional, our staff is available to answer your tough questions. We use what we sell, so you can be assured that when you purchase from us, we're able to help you with your sharpener.
An extremely well written and informative article on sharpening. Overtime we all get to love certain stones for our sharpening needs. I am a huge coticule fan, and although i have used all the others, i always come back to this natural stone above all others. Still trying to figure if i chose it or it chose me! NEver the less there are so many options out there it is not hard with a little time and effort to find the right combination for your needs.
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