A few times in this guide, you have been witnessed to Arkansas stones. As you probably know by now, these are not Waterstones. Still, users have begged the question of whether or not water can be used in place of oil. For the most part, most manufacturers will advise against using water in place of oil for these types of stones. The reason for this is actually due to the issue of using water as a lubricant. You see, with oil, when you apply it for the first time, some of it is going to remain on it. So, even while in storage, it partially contains oil and then the next time you need it, you will not need as much.
This King’s sharpening stone is a double-sided whetstone; one side features a 1000 grit, and the other a 6000 grit size. Now, is it affordable? Not quite; but it’s still reasonably priced; you’ll get excellent value for the price, that’s for sure. Easy to use (well, once you figure it out) and with an outstanding sharpening performance, what else could you ask for?
A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.
Second step: Now is time to do the actual sharpening. If you have a combination whetstone (meaning that it has two faces with different grit), you always need to start with the coarse grit, and then, the final polishing of the blade is done with a fine grit. While smootly sliding the edge of your knife's blade across the surface of the stone, try to always maintain a stable angle between the blade and stone (in between 15 and 30 degrees). You can use a sharpening angle guide to help you maintain the right angle at all times. 
We begin our whetstone sharpening process with a 400 grit stone to shape the edge of the blade and develop a burr along the edge of the knife. Once the shape is set and we have a burr along the full length of the knife we move on to the 1000 grit stone to refine the edge and begin removing the burr, followed by the 5000 grit fine stone stone to give a beautiful sharp edge on the blade. We finish off each knife on a leather stropping block which removes the final remnants of the burr and gives a strong and lasting edge.
This is an important but often confusing aspect of the sharpening process. When you sharpen knives, especially on coarser stones, you'll notice a burr form on the opposite side of the edge. It can be difficult to see, but easy to feel. Carefully feel for the burr by running your finger from the spine of the knife to the edge. The burr will jump from side to side as you sharpen each edge, and once you've felt the burr move to both sides, you can move to the next finer stone. Once you get to the finest grit, the burr will become smaller and smaller!
Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil!
MULTIPLE USES: The stone can be used to sharpen all your kitchen knives as well as other tools around the house. Restore an edge to a pair of scissors or cutting shears for the garden. The 1000 grit is for establishing the proper cutting edge angle. The 6000 grit will bring the edge to razor sharp. Hone it with newspaper over the stone and you will be amazed.
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