We offer a series of oilstone packages that combine India and Arkansas stones and are very reasonably priced. At 8" long by 2" wide these stones are not as wide as some other types, but still wide enough for many edges and are plenty wide for knife sharpeners. Available in four price levels, these kits are a great opportunity for the beginning sharpener on a budget.

✅ PREMIUM QUALITY : Our products have been inspected by a reputable third party inspection company. Each product has been checked, put under a durability and functionality test before shipped to you. NO COMPROMISE on quality! This simple-yet-unparalled award winning tool is used by everyone from stay at home moms to various professionals. Don’t forget to buy this as a PERFECT GIFT for your family & friends.
What a bamboo base, or any similar base, is going to do is stabilize the whetstone to ensure it does not slip while you are sharpening your knife. The reason why you will see bamboo a lot is due to the properties of the material. Bamboo itself is a wood and is actually a bit harder than oak and ash. Even for flooring, it adds stability and that is exactly what you are looking for to prevent any slippage.
The more you use the sharpening stone; the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded over time. When you notice that it is taking much longer to hone blades and edges, it means you need to replace the stone with a new one. Sharpening stones come with decks that make it convenient to keep the tool in balance on the stone.

For instance, if you have a kitchen knife with a strong blade that has a hardness rating of 58 HRC in the Rockwell scale such as the knives from the popular Wusthof Classic series, you'll need a sharpening stone with fine grit. On the other hand, if your knife has a lover level of hardness such as 53 HRC, then you will need a whetstone with coarse grit.
Aluminum-Oxide oil stones are very popular man-made sharpening stones produced by an abrasives company called Norton and which are commonly called India Stones. Generally less expensive than Arkansas stones (aka Novaculite), these stones are graded coarse, medium, and fine and are designed for fast cutting. Yet, when the fine grit is used, they can also produce a relatively fine edge. Also, because India Oil Stones are both softer and coarser than Arkansas Stones, they are commonly used in conjunction with Novaculite to cut the initial edge bevels or, repair extremely dull or damaged edges before refining and polishing the bevel with an Arkansas Stone.
Understanding Grit: You’ll see a bunch of numbers being thrown around when discussing the grit of a sharpening stone. The number refers to the size of the grit. The larger the number, the finer the grit. A good beginner stone would be a two-sided stone with #400 and #1000 grit. The #400 grit is the courser stone for working out the nicks and imperfections, the #1000 grit is for refining.
I bought this stone to get my grand father’s straight razor back to being shave ready. Originally I was looking for a 4000/8000 combo but I liked the price and didn’t think the 3000 would be an issue. The stone arrived in a nice reusable package to keep to safe from breaking, along with a lap stone to keep the sharpening stone level. Prepping the stone was a beeeze and it didn’t take long before there was a true edge back on the straight razor. Definitely a good stone at an excellent price.
I would recommend that you only purchase this product if you have lower grit stones in addition to this. 3000 and 8000 are really for honing and polishing, and it will take you a LONG time to sharpen a kitchen knife with only this combination of grits. However, once you have sharpened your knives these will be helpful for maintaining the sharp edge through regular honing.
Some stones need water, while other stones need oil for floating the swarf (small metal filings created when sharpening) away. Simply apply a few drops of either oil or water directly to the stone. (We recommend using an inexpensive spray bottle for applying the water.) The lubricant you need is determined by the type of stone you are using. Water stones and diamond stones require water. Oil stones such as India, Crystolon and Arkansas stones use oil for a lubricant.
This pocket-size Lansky dual grit has a coarse 120 grit side and a medium 280 grit side. The unique tool is ideal for sharpening a wide variety of blades. The Puck’s contoured shape is very much grip-able and provides enough safety while you do your tool sharpening. Its coarse side provides quick cutting and shaping, and the medium side will help to get the final finishing of the edge.
BearMoo is a market-leader in the manufacture of top-grade sharpening stones for kitchen knives. This particular sharpening stone features a top grade dual sided construction which makes it ideal for sharpening of the edges as well as the polishing and finishing. The coarse side features 3000 grit while the fine side boasts 8000 grit for added convenience.
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