The goal when sharpening is to create a burr, which is a tiny whisper of metal left on one side of the blade. You'll know you have a burr when you can feel one smooth and one scratchy side to the edge. Warner's is formed in no time at all; I struggled. Nevertheless, eventually I got there. Once you've got the burr, it's time to move on to step three.
Furthermore, Novaculite consists of several different layers of stone of different densities, grit sizes, and colors. Thus, the red Novaculite layer (aka Washita Stone) is the both the softest and most coarse while, the next most coarse/hard grade is the grey/white Soft Arkansas stone; both of which cut relatively fast for a hard whetstone material and thus, they are an excellent choice for refining a bevel. Then, the next grade of coarseness/hardness is the hard Arkansas stone which is used to polish the bevel rather than define it and, last there are the grades of Hard Black and Hard Translucent Arkansas stones which are used for extremely fine honing and polishing of a cutting edge. Plus, it’s also the primary material in “Charnley Forest” (English) and “Turkey” oilstones.
It is important to mention that  knives with lower levels of hardness are easier to sharpen, but they need to be sharpened more frequently because they lose faster the sharpness of their edge. Therefore, as you can imagine, knives with harder blades retain for longer time their sharpness, and that is why they need finer whetstones, because stones with coarse grit would end up actually damaging the blade.
MULTIPLE USES: The stone can be used to sharpen all your kitchen knives as well as other tools around the house. Restore an edge to a pair of scissors or cutting shears for the garden. The 1000 grit is for establishing the proper cutting edge angle. The 6000 grit will bring the edge to razor sharp. Hone it with newspaper over the stone and you will be amazed.
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