We recommend that customers invest in Kamikoto’s Toishi Sharpening Whetstone to keep handcrafted knives sharp and ready to cut. The Toishi Sharpening Whetstone sits on a beautiful wooden bamboo stand and features two sides – one with a coarse grit to grind away any roughness, and the other with a fine grit that sharpens and polishes the edge. The finer the grit, the finer the edge on your knife. The sturdy wooden stand holds the whetstone safely in place so you can concentrate on gaining the sharpest edge possible.


Conveniently bundled in one affordable set for you, our Sharp Pebble Waterstone (Grit 3000/8000) with Non-Slip Bamboo base. Grit 3000 can quickly sharp the blade while Grit 8000 is used to achieve finely polished mirror finished edge. Flattening Stone is used for leveling of Sharp Pebble Grit 3000/8000 Stone And a Knife Sharpening Guide(eBook) describing how to make the most out of the product.
I enjoy these stones so much that the feedback is not a deterrent at all for me, I don’t even think about it. The results are always nothing but top notch, they deliver exactly what I want, some of the sharpest knives I have ever produced were sharpened on Shapton Glass stones. They may be thinner but they last a very long time, they are easy to maintain as well,
You’ll know you’re reached a stopping point when you can feel the slight catch of the bevel on the edge of the blade, by carefully running your finger in the direction of the blade, or by cutting through a sheet of paper. When the knife cuts cleanly through the paper, it’s time to hone the blade. Read our guide for more information about honing vs sharpening.
As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.
I am completely satisfied with the quality and value of this product. I have been able to get my kitchen knives "scary sharp". I can slice ripe tomatos almost paper thin with very little pressure. Thank you for the prompt delivery as well. I haven't tried the blade guide yet but I am sure it would work satisfactorily as it has rollers on either side and may even prolong the life of the stone and having to use the flattening stone as often.
You need to adjust your fingers as you move the knife back and forth. Because sharpening takes place under your fingers, start with them at the tip and, as you pull the knife back toward you, release pressure completely and pause. Then, shift your fingers just a little down the blade toward the heel. This finger dance is critical and takes time getting used to.
Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.
While it may still feel like there is a lot to choose from, you don’t need a lot of of stones, you just a several good varieties to choose from. To summarize I will indicate below what my favourite stones are in each grit. Yes you can mix up the brands when sharpening but my recommendation is to buy a combination of 2-3 stones of the same brand and go from there.
Japanese water stones are the most famous. These are usually made from sedimentary rock and for the most part are fairly fragile. They are intended to only use be used with water as oil will destroy them. Waterstones wear out more quickly than other types but they are very easy to flatten when required. The ever common oil stone Oil stones are much like the Japanese waterstones but are more durable. With these you can use either oil or water. Most famous type of these stones are the Arkansas oilstones harvested from the Washita mountains.
If in doubt or just learning, a safe bet is a set of quality synthetic stones. They’re the easiest to use, require the least maintenance and are the most forgiving. If you’re just starting out we highly recommend the Naniwa Sharpening Stones. They’re excellent quality, reliable, durable and no soaking time is required. For advanced users we recommend the Naniwa Pro sharpening stones or Kaiden Ceramics.
There is nothing more annoying than trying to prepare your favourite dish and having to cut your ingredients using a knife that lacks sharpness and precision. In fact, more than being annoying, using a knife that is not sharp can be dangerous, because it might lead you to apply force on it and cause an accident. For that reason, regardless of whether you are a professional chef or a home cook, it is very important give proper maintenance to your knives' blades by sharpening them when it is required. Luckily, there are several types of accessories that can be used for sharpening steel blades, and one of the most popular ones are the sharpening stones. 
All stones require either water or oil as a lubricant to sharpen the knife. We prefer water stones because they’re easier to use, less messy and don’t have the possibility to go rancid like oil does. If you choose a water stone, all you have to do is either add water to the stone before placing the knife on the surface, or soak the stone in water for 10 minutes before use. You’ll want to read the instruction for the stone you purchase to find out how to use it properly.
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