Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 
Thanks to the legacy at Kamikoto, I'm the proud owner of the last cooking knives I will ever need. Strong, perfectly balanced, comfortable and beautifully designed. Kamikoto has truly exceeded all expectations. Along with a superior product comes excellent customer service. Every inquiry was answered quickly and diligently. The moment these blades are removed from their casing you can feel the craftsmanship. But it's when you put them to the counter they truly sing. I will enjoy my Kamikoto blades for the rest of my life. Thank you from Hawaii !! Isaac S.

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4. Start sharpening the first side of the blade. With your blade set at the prefect angle, you’re ready to start sharpening. Imagine you’re carving off a slim piece of the stone’s surface. Personally, I bring the blade into the stone. Other people stroke the blade away from the stone. Both ways work, so just use whatever technique you prefer. If the knife blade is curved or if it’s longer than the stone, you’ll need to sweep the blade sideways as you work, so the entire edge is sharpened evenly. Apply moderate pressure as you sharpen. No need to bear down hard on the blade. After you make one stroke, start back at the beginning and repeat. Do this about 6-12 times.
Thanks to the legacy at Kamikoto, I'm the proud owner of the last cooking knives I will ever need. Strong, perfectly balanced, comfortable and beautifully designed. Kamikoto has truly exceeded all expectations. Along with a superior product comes excellent customer service. Every inquiry was answered quickly and diligently. The moment these blades are removed from their casing you can feel the craftsmanship. But it's when you put them to the counter they truly sing. I will enjoy my Kamikoto blades for the rest of my life. Thank you from Hawaii !! Isaac S.
I purchased this set as a gift to myself and my wife we both love to cook . It’s only been a couple of months we use them almost every day and the knives are excellent they are razor-sharp but I highly recommend you order the Whetstone for keeping them that way. I’ve used many different knives sets over my life and these seem to be by for the best quality.
Be careful: Don’t move your fingers laterally along the edge, you’ll cut yourself. Feel for a rough area running from tip to heel. Again, it takes time to know what to expect because the best burr will be subtle. Just know that the bigger the burr, the more metal you are removing—more than necessary. Don’t worry, you won’t ruin the knife doing this. You’re learning here, and mistakes are part of the sharpening journey. Learn from them.
I bet those Vikings, relatives of mine no doubt, never had it so good. They never had surated blades to sharpen or needed to wear cool things around their necks to woo the women (they just grabbed them by the hair I guess). I love my stone. So useful and beautiful. I always have spit to wet it with, and I always have a way to sharpen my tool. Wazoo makes high quality products. I give them the highest rating I have. Dudes!
4. Start sharpening the first side of the blade. With your blade set at the prefect angle, you’re ready to start sharpening. Imagine you’re carving off a slim piece of the stone’s surface. Personally, I bring the blade into the stone. Other people stroke the blade away from the stone. Both ways work, so just use whatever technique you prefer. If the knife blade is curved or if it’s longer than the stone, you’ll need to sweep the blade sideways as you work, so the entire edge is sharpened evenly. Apply moderate pressure as you sharpen. No need to bear down hard on the blade. After you make one stroke, start back at the beginning and repeat. Do this about 6-12 times.
From the moment I ordered the knife set, I was emailed every step of the way till they were delivered. When I opened the box I instantly knew I made the correct decision. The weight, balance and edge were perfect. A few of my friends have handled them as well and all have asked the same question. How can I get these. I highly recommend these knives.
Turn around time is typically between 3 and 7 days. We offer same-day rush for an extra 50% fee. If you are in the industry and work with your knives please call the shop at 415 355 0773, we are able accommodate industry schedules, please be prepared to prove you use your knives or tools as part of your trade. Sharpening can be dropped off at the store on the corner of Guerrero and 18th, or mailed-in.
We are proud of our products and it is very important that you, as a customer, are happy with the service and products we provide.This is why we have a 2 year guarantee on most of our products and on specific products we leave a 25 year guarantee. The only exception is on consumables (such as batteries and light bulbs). Keep a look out for our guarantee-logo next to your chosen product to see what guarantee package it has. Our guarantee means that the product is expected to work just like we have described it during the time of guarantee we have promised (This in addition to the rights under consumer purchasing).
3. Place the knife blade flat on the stone and raise it to a 10 to 15 degree angle. The key to knife sharpening is maintaining a constant angle. Different knives require different sharpening angles. For a pocket knife, shoot for a 10 to 15 degree angle. This will give you an edge that’s sharp enough for most daily needs, but not sharp enough to perform heart surgery.  Keeping a constant angle by hand takes a lot of practice. If you’re having difficulty, you might consider investing in a sharpening guide. It takes all the guess work out of maintaining the needed angle. They cost about $10.
The 6000 grit is great for having a nicely polished edge, it's the last step stone that I use for my knives in the kitchen. I like the King stones in general, they're a really good value and last much longer than the discount/cheap water stones. I use these stones to keep all of my kitchen knives nice and sharp and haven't had an issue with these stones. I also like that these soak quickly, I let them soak for about 10-20 minutes and they're ready to use. I have to flatten these a little more often than more expensive stones but I knew that was probably going to be the case when I bought them.
It is believed that Vikings suspended these knife sharpening tools from their belt. However, it is not exactly clear, even to scholars, how the Vikings wore these pendants. We laced ours with a versatile, adjustable high-quality leather cord and packed it in a USA-made muslin pouch so you get to choose how to wear it or carry it. Wear it around the neck for the most Ragnariest looking necklace you’ve ever seen, cinch it all the way down so that it can be hitched to your belt or clipped onto your pack, or simply pocket it while still contained in the hand-stamped muslin pouch.
In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
We’ve shown you how to keep knives sharp before, and even discussed why water stones are best, but this crash course is quick, fast, and gets to the point. In most cases the most the average person at home can do is either hone their blade with a honing steel, which straightens and lines up the blade’s edge, but it doesn’t sharpen it. Alternatively you could run it through a handheld or electronic sharpener, but depending on the model you use it can do more harm than good.
The unique three stone system features a 6" medium Arkansas, 6" fine Arkansas and 6" coarse synthetic stone mounted on a molded plastic triangle with handles on the end for easy stone selection. The sturdy molded plastic base has non-skid rubber feet for safety, a V-shaped trough to catch oil drippings and easy-to- read stone identification markings.
These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
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