Not sure why I bought this item and then I received it. It has a bit of a 'cool' factor and is well made. I took the sharp edges of the stone as they were a bit uncomfortable on my chest but have since been wearing it a lot. Used it to put an edge on some workmates knives and to tickle up my own daily use knife. I like it, it is a bit different and useful.
I had wanted a pair of sharpening stones for a while, so was enthused to get this last week. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos on how to use them and a deburring strop I also bought and wow, my kitchen and pocket knives are now wicked sharp. Pro tip: if you post anything about it on social media, family and friends will almost surely volunteer their knives for more practice...
You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
Hobby microscope view of a 220 grit diamond sharpening stone. Tiny diamonds are electroplated to a perforated metal carrier strip and bonded to a plastic backing. The feature identified with the red line across it measures about 0.08 mm across. The dark area at upper right is a void designed to allow for swarf created during sharpening to be cleared from the diamonds. This relatively coarse stone would be used to reshape a damaged blade edge which would be refined by finer grit stones.
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 
We regret that due to technical challenges caused by new regulations in Europe, we can for the time being no longer accept orders from the European Union. If you reside in the UK you can continue to order from our UK websites or shop from our locations and partners. Visit West Elm at www.westelm.co.uk and Pottery Barn Kids at www.potterybarnkids.co.uk.
These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
At age 10, Terada learned the basics of sushi from his father and then went on to attend RKC Chef's School in Kochi, Japan from 1987-1989. He soon earned a nickname for his fast knife, attention to detail, divine presentation and ability to create new dishes and accents based on traditional Japanese cuisine. After graduating RKC Chef School, he was called to serve under Master Chef Kondo at Yuzuan restaurant in Kochi, Japan from 1989-1992. Mr. Kondo is the master of Kansai style cooking, considered to be the high-end of Japanese cuisine. Terada earned the title Master Sushi Chef by becoming the standing head sushi chef & can serve Fugu (Japan Licensed) to the public.
I'm using this for a set of kitchen knives. As far as their quality goes, they are a name brand, but middle tier at best. The kind you can pick up at a mall kitchen store. They were all dull and in need of sharpening. After using these stones, my knives were all insanely sharp. They were noticably sharper than when I first bought them. I'm not experienced with sharpening stones, so I can't say how these compare with others, but for my needs as a non-professional, this set is perfect. Outperforms my needs.

I bet those Vikings, relatives of mine no doubt, never had it so good. They never had surated blades to sharpen or needed to wear cool things around their necks to woo the women (they just grabbed them by the hair I guess). I love my stone. So useful and beautiful. I always have spit to wet it with, and I always have a way to sharpen my tool. Wazoo makes high quality products. I give them the highest rating I have. Dudes!
Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
The newly designed dual-sided combination whetstone from Fallkniven features a super fine white ceramic stone (0, 1 micron) with a grit of 1400 to 2000 and the dark grey ceramic stone is made of synthetic sapphires (1 micron) and has a grit of 800-1000. There is no need to add any oil or water, just lay the blade on the stone, raise the blade's spine and deburr your blade on the grey side until it has a razor-sharp edge and then use the smooth white side to get a nice polished edge.
Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 
Modern synthetic stones are generally of equal quality to natural stones, and are often considered superior in sharpening performance due to consistency of particle size and control over the properties of the stones. For example, the proportional content of abrasive particles as opposed to base or "binder" materials can be controlled to make the stone cut faster or slower, as desired.[7] Natural stones are often prized for their natural beauty as stones and their rarity, adding value as collectors' items. Furthermore, each natural stone is different, and there are rare natural stones that contain abrasive particles in grit sizes finer than are currently available in artificial stones.[citation needed]
My order came in incomplete. I contacted the company and had a response within a couple hours. They immediately responded, researched and started the replacement process. I had my order replacement within 1 week or so. Every email was answered the same day. I so highly recommend this company. LOVE MY PRODUCT AND LOVE THE SERVICE MORE. GREAT COMPANY.

Prior to using any kind of sharpening stone, it is advised that individuals soak the sharpening stone in light machine oil or household oil for at least 12 hours before being used. Before being used, it is advisable to wipe the surface of the sharpening stone to get rid of grime, grit or dirt that may have accumulated overtime during the time of storage.

Push the point you want to sharpen with your fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone, then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures) Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade.

The toughest angle to master is the angle at which you'll sharpen the edge of the knife. For a Japanese knife, that should be around 12-15 degrees. Before you reach for the protractor, a good test is to get roughly half an index finger's gap between the spine of the knife and the stone (see above). Remember to remove your finger before you start sharpening. For a Western-style knife, you want an angle of about 20°, so raise it ever-so-slightly higher.
Very handsome and functional. The leather that makes up the necklace is high quality and the knot they use is seldom seen. I was able to touch up my bark River gunny sidekick with it( m4 steel at 62-64 hrc!), And that is saying something. Haven't tested the fish hook groove, because I don't generally fish in the winter, but I'm looking forward to trying it out
The stone arrived in perfect condition. I like the size as it does not take up much room on the counter. The one used professionally was very large and heavy. I have not put and edge on my knives for over 5 years. A whetstone is a luxury I could only afford recently. Given how dull they were it did not take long to put a nice sharp edge on them. What a joy to use a well care for tool again. The grit size was perfect too. One to put an edge on the knives and the other to finish and remove burrs[sp]
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