Not sure why I bought this item and then I received it. It has a bit of a 'cool' factor and is well made. I took the sharp edges of the stone as they were a bit uncomfortable on my chest but have since been wearing it a lot. Used it to put an edge on some workmates knives and to tickle up my own daily use knife. I like it, it is a bit different and useful.
Heres why I wasn't impressed at first. I only used it for a few minutes on each side, which resulted in nothing. I watched a video online with a master chef using his stone, and he sharpened his knife for 10 minutes on each stone before moving up to a finer grit. I took this hint, and used sharpened my knife on each side of this stone for 10 minutes, which led to perfection.
I had wanted a pair of sharpening stones for a while, so was enthused to get this last week. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos on how to use them and a deburring strop I also bought and wow, my kitchen and pocket knives are now wicked sharp. Pro tip: if you post anything about it on social media, family and friends will almost surely volunteer their knives for more practice...
3-STAGE KNIFE SHARPENER: Sharpen dull knife quickly with the incredible 3-stage knife sharpening system. The 2nd diamond slot provides general sharpening before the 1st tungsten slot repairs and straightens damaged blades, the 3rd ceramic slot fine tunes for a clean polish. QUICKLY BRING BACK SHARP BLADE : Why spend more money buying a new knife? With this kitchen knife sharpener, you can recycle your old, dull knife and sharpen them back to life. HIGH QUALITY:This best knife sharpener made of ceramic, diamond, tungsten steel and high quality ABS plastic. It's very safe, stable, durable. EASY TO USE: Simply place your dull knife in the sharpening slot and gently pull the knife through a few times for fast, effective sharpening.
My order came in incomplete. I contacted the company and had a response within a couple hours. They immediately responded, researched and started the replacement process. I had my order replacement within 1 week or so. Every email was answered the same day. I so highly recommend this company. LOVE MY PRODUCT AND LOVE THE SERVICE MORE. GREAT COMPANY.
Method 1: Use an Electric Sharpener. Quality electric sharpeners are an option, but I strongly discourage their use. First off, they remove a tremendous amount of material from your edge. Sharpen your knife a dozen times, and you've lost a good half-centimeter of width, throwing it off balance, and rendering any blade with a bolster (i.e. most high-end forged blades) useless. Secondly, even the best models provide only an adequate edge. If you don't mind replacing your knives every few years and are happy with the edge they give you, they'll do the trick. But a much better choice is to...

Push the point you want to sharpen with your fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone, then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures) Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade.
Begin with your lower-grit stone. Place the heel of your knife on the far edge of the stone, holding the blade gently but firmly with both hands at a 15- to 20-degree angle. Using even pressure, slowly drag the knife over the stone toward you down the length of the stone while simultaneously moving the knife such that the contact point moves toward the tip of the blade.

As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.
OUR UNIVERSAL WHETSTONES AREN’T JUST FOR KITCHEN KNIVES The Mikarto honing stones aren’t just ideal for kitchen knives; they can be used for just about anything with a blade. Designed to optimize the fluidity of your cutting device, our manual sharpening stone can be used for carving knives, hunting knives, butterfly knives, pocket knives, army knives, razor blades, scissors, pocket knives, or clippers. This multipurpose set is great as both an indoor and outdoor knife sharpener.
This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.
Chefs will do this every day, and there's no reason you shouldn't too. Before cooking, or after you've done the washing up, honing your knife will help keep it in good condition. "When you're using a honing steel, you're not actually removing any metal at all, just re-straightening that edge, to get it back in line," says Authbert. Remember that you'll still need to sharpen it every two or three months. 
My order came in incomplete. I contacted the company and had a response within a couple hours. They immediately responded, researched and started the replacement process. I had my order replacement within 1 week or so. Every email was answered the same day. I so highly recommend this company. LOVE MY PRODUCT AND LOVE THE SERVICE MORE. GREAT COMPANY.
I do have to question the grit ratings of these stones. I didn't notice anything before using them, but after a day, the 2000 grit actually felt courser than the 1000 grit side of the other stone. Whether that could be a byproduct of other factors or an indication of the more obvious, being that the grit ratings aren't accurate, I don't know. But that seemed to be the main criticism of cheaper whetstones, that their grit ratings often aren't accurate. Or maybe it's less a problem with accuracy and more a difference that most synthetic stones might have in common when being compared to much pricier natural stones?
ENSURE THE SMOOTHEST CUT When it comes to matters of the kitchen, nothing is more frustrating than a knife that doesn’t cut properly. Whether it’s cutting meat and cheese or dicing vegetables and herbs, you want a knife that is sharp enough you don’t need to worry about slippage or poor performance. Cooking should be an enjoyable experience, but when your cutlery doesn’t work, it turns a relaxing activity into an annoyance. The Mikarto stone is a great and affordable solution for dull knives.
Chefs will do this every day, and there's no reason you shouldn't too. Before cooking, or after you've done the washing up, honing your knife will help keep it in good condition. "When you're using a honing steel, you're not actually removing any metal at all, just re-straightening that edge, to get it back in line," says Authbert. Remember that you'll still need to sharpen it every two or three months. 
Whetstones are a gentle and an effective way to sharpen knives. WÜSTHOF whetstones consist of a combination of high-quality abrasive grits. Much like other sharpening techniques, whetstones offer a fine grit (honing) and a coarse grit (sharpening). The coarse grit is used to grind away material from the knife, allowing it to reset the edge. The fine grit can be used for regular maintenance or after sharpening in order to realign the microscopic teeth on the blade.
Diamond whetstones, like the DMT Diamond Whetstone, are made out of industrial type diamonds which create a long-lasting hard, coarse and flat surface. A diamond whetstone is an excellent choice for when you are outdoors as you can use it dry or with a lubricant. It can take some time getting used to and the larger sized stone may not be ideal for working with small knives or cutting tools.
I did a lot of research and bought this along with a diamond flat stone... and the henckles steel. The sharpest I got my knife (using a microscope to see the edge at 1000x) was using the diamonds stone up to 1000 grit, then straighten it with the steel, then use this stone to basically polish the knife. You are basically making the very very edge smooth and what this does is makes your blade last much longer before it needs sharpening. The edge of a knife looks like a hacksaw under a microscope so just picture making the teeth smaller. I will tell you if you use your knife on anything hard you just need a steel to realign the edge. You can do that about 5-10x before you need to sharpen it again. I learned a lot using a microscope to see the edge.
Push the point you want to sharpen with your fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone, then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures) Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade.
Don't know. Not sure that I really care, as these stones definitely did the job that was asked of them, and did it with ease, even for a beginner whetstone user. I'll probably stick with them, at least until I get a lot more experience. Though, I do see a 10,000 or higher grit stone in my immediate future - more to play around with, than a feeling of genuine need.
Over the course of two days I re-sharpened nearly a dozen old blades, including removing the secondary bevel on an old stainless Ontario saber-grind Navy diver's knife, convexing the edge on flat ground 1095 Schrade 55 that also came with a secondary bevel, and fixing a broken tip on an old Kershaw folder. These stones made quick work of the Schrade and Kershaw. Both had completely new edge geometry within 30 minutes apiece. The Kershaw looked like-new, as if the tip had never broken. And the Schrade cut much better than it's secondary bevel would previously allow, regardless of how sharp I got it with a ceramic rod and strops. The Ontario took a little more work, as it had been abused a little the last time I'd held it, over 25 years ago and was as dull as a case knife - one of the reasons I decided to go ahead and do a full saber grind - well, a slightly convexed saber, I suppose would be more accurate. But within under an hour of using the two stones and a couple leather strops (one with black compound, another with green), the Ontario was shaving sharp again too.
To use a whetstone you run the knife's blade back and forth across the stone's surface and due to the constant friction with the stone, which acts like a piece of sandpaper, the knife's edge becomes razor sharp and has a brilliant mirror shine. If you are a beginner at using a whetstone it can a take a while to master the sharpening process, so here is a video to help you with your sharpening stone skills.
Prior to using any kind of sharpening stone, it is advised that individuals soak the sharpening stone in light machine oil or household oil for at least 12 hours before being used. Before being used, it is advisable to wipe the surface of the sharpening stone to get rid of grime, grit or dirt that may have accumulated overtime during the time of storage.

A diamond plate is a steel plate, sometimes mounted on a plastic or resin base, coated with diamond grit, an abrasive that will grind metal. When they are mounted they are sometimes known as diamond stones.[12] The plate may have a series of holes cut in it that capture the swarf cast off as grinding takes place, and cuts costs by reducing the amount of abrasive surface area on each plate. Diamond plates can serve many purposes including sharpening steel tools, and for maintaining the flatness of man-made waterstones, which can become grooved or hollowed in use. Truing (flattening a stone whose shape has been changed as it wears away) is widely considered essential to the sharpening process but some hand sharpening techniques utilise the high points of a non-true stone. As the only part of a diamond plate to wear away is a very thin coating of grit and adhesive, and in a good diamond plate this wear is minimal due to diamond's hardness, a diamond plate retains its flatness. Rubbing the diamond plate on a whetstone to true (flatten) the whetstone is a modern alternative to more traditional truing methods.[13]
Know your stones: Whetstones are made with a range of materials, from ceramics to synthetics, or a cement-like conglomerate of finely ground stone. All whetstones are categorized according to grit, or coarseness. Rough stones have a lower grit count and are the first step in sharpening a particularly dull or chipped blade. Medium whetstones hover in the 800- to 2,000-grit range and are most often the first step in sharpening a knife. Whetstones with a grit count of 3,000 or above are referred to as finishing stones, and are used for refining and polishing.
Highest Quality Engineering and Materials Each of our superior Whetstones are made from the highest quality bonded abrasive compound of aluminium oxide or ‘ Corundum’. Unlike Natural Whetstones, our bonded abrasives provide a faster cutting action and are considered superior in sharpening performance due to consistency of particle size and control over the properties of the stones. Double-sided with coarse grit on one side and fine grit on the other, just the one stone satisfies the fundamental requirements for superior knife sharpening.
1. Start off with the rough grit. If you have a particularly dull blade, start off with the rough grit side of your sharpening stone. How do you tell which side is the rough grit? Sometimes you can tell by sight. If you can’t do that, do a thumbnail test. Scratch the surface with your thumbnail and whichever side feels rougher, that’s the side you want to start off with. Also, rough grits tend to be more porous than finer grits. So if you put water on one side and the stone really drinks it up, chances are it’s the rough grit.

But it's a different type of sharp, according to Joe Authbert, product development manager at ProCook. "What it does is add tiny little micro-serrations onto the edge of the blade." But fear not - your smart knife won't end up looking like a bread knife, as you'll be hard-pressed to spot the serrations. "If you looked at it under a microscope, on the cutting edge, there are these little lines that generate the sharpness, rather than a waterstone which is a smooth sharp edge," says Authbert. 


Repeat the process on the opposite side of the blade, this time with the edge facing down, index finger on the spine and thumb on the heel. Because the direction of the edge has changed, you’ll now be applying pressure when swiping up. To ensure consistent pressure, avoid switching hands. Grind the full length of the blade along the whetstone, and check for a burr.
TO USE: Soak stone in water for no more than 5-10 minutes. Place stone on a damp cloth with the courser 400 grit side (dark green) facing up. Hold the knife so that it’s flat and perpendicular to the block, with the blade facing left. Holding the knife at a 20-degree angle, slowly sweep the edge of the blade from left to right down the length of the stone and continue until sharp. If stone starts to feel too dry, add more water. Be patient and take your time. Flip knife over and repeat on the other side (now moving from right to left). Be sure to sharpen both sides evenly. To polish the blade further, flip stone over to the fine 1000 grit side (light green) and repeat the process. When blade is honed to desired sharpness, wash and dry your knife. To clean your stone, simply rinse with water, wipe away any remaining metal residue with a rag, rinse again, then dry.

Novaculite is a type of stone that can only be found in North America and in a limited geographical region of Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. The novacula stone formation in the Ouachitas of Central Arkansas is geologically considered, without a doubt, to be the purest and finest quality.  Its extremely high-purity silica content exceeds 99 percent. This Ouachita Mountain Novaculite is the only Novaculite we use in producing the FINEST whetstone sharpeners you can buy.
Medieval people typically used a whetstone to sharpen their knives for use either in cooking or in their craft. Whetstones were not necessarily used by an individual looking for superior quality, but were instead used mostly as a convenient tool for a quick sharpening. This is exemplified by the hole present near the top of the whetstone through which craftsmen could string some sort of cord to tie the whetstone to their clothing, which makes carrying this tool relatively simple. The guilds of London likely used whetstones regularly, as many crafts such as curriers or cooks relied on the rigorous use of blades, which could thus become dull and unusable. However, using a whetstone to finish a freshly made blade was considered inappropriate, as it would not provide the same edge as a proper grindstone would. The grindstone was a much larger instrument, capable of sharpening a blade much more quickly and effectively than a whetstone because of the speed at which one could use it. It was used more in the initial crafting of a blade, but the whetstone was used for regular upkeep. As mentioned, some crafts were displeased with the use of whetstones to finish their products. The Bladesmiths, for instance, of fifteenth-century London were particularly careful about ensuring that their blades were not ruined by others using a whetstone rather than a grindstone. They raised an official complaint about this issue at one point, which suggests that the people in charge of ensuring the sharpness of their blades were slacking off. 

Works well. Just got it today, sharpened two pocket knives, one a 8Cr13MoV Chinese steel, the other s30v American steel The stone made short work of both steels (which were pretty sharp already). But notably was able to make the s30v hair shaving sharp easily, something I've had trouble with. Inexpensive and useful, I love this stone. It's not the Ninja sharp 8000+ grits that you can find, but for pocket knives and EDC, it's perfect and inexpensive. Get One!!!!!!!!!!!!
I did a lot of research and bought this along with a diamond flat stone... and the henckles steel. The sharpest I got my knife (using a microscope to see the edge at 1000x) was using the diamonds stone up to 1000 grit, then straighten it with the steel, then use this stone to basically polish the knife. You are basically making the very very edge smooth and what this does is makes your blade last much longer before it needs sharpening. The edge of a knife looks like a hacksaw under a microscope so just picture making the teeth smaller. I will tell you if you use your knife on anything hard you just need a steel to realign the edge. You can do that about 5-10x before you need to sharpen it again. I learned a lot using a microscope to see the edge.
×