I've used ceramic rods, diamond plates, and leather strops for our sharpening needs. And, like most, I've tried a dozen little gimmicky sharpeners that, while some work, those that do often remove way too much material from the edge, making your blade wear down faster. I've also used oil stones, grinders and buffers for less meticulous sharpening of axes and such. These two stones from Unimi (600/1000 and 2000/6000) served as my introduction to whetstone sharpening. And I must say I like it. Though, I'm not sure of the need for investing in more expensive stones.

I was delighted to discover, on opening my recently purchased Kanpeki knife set, single-edged blades. I had never used single-edged blades in the kitchen. I was pleasantly surprised to find each knife was so versatile. Able to do the most delicate cutting, to the workhorse of basic slicing and dicing. I am pleased to say, I will be purchasing the remaining knives and whetstone.
I did a lot of research and bought this along with a diamond flat stone... and the henckles steel. The sharpest I got my knife (using a microscope to see the edge at 1000x) was using the diamonds stone up to 1000 grit, then straighten it with the steel, then use this stone to basically polish the knife. You are basically making the very very edge smooth and what this does is makes your blade last much longer before it needs sharpening. The edge of a knife looks like a hacksaw under a microscope so just picture making the teeth smaller. I will tell you if you use your knife on anything hard you just need a steel to realign the edge. You can do that about 5-10x before you need to sharpen it again. I learned a lot using a microscope to see the edge.
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