A good whetstone and a little practice will keep all of your knives sharp and in perfect condition. The beauty is that it doesn’t take much effort to learn, just a good bit of practice to get the angle right and keep a consistent angle while you’re sharpening. Whetstones are available in department stores or online, and while they range in price based on the fineness of the grit, this thread at eGullet can help you pick a good grit to start with.
Four hundred million years ago in a small geographical region of Central Arkansas, now part of the Ouachita Mountains, nature began the creation of a sedimentary rock formation composed of microcrystalline quartz called Novaculite. The word Novaculite comes from the Latin word novacula, meaning razor stone. Novaculite is a recrystallized variety of chert. It is the stone material from which whetstone and oilstone sharpeners are made.
Know your stones: Whetstones are made with a range of materials, from ceramics to synthetics, or a cement-like conglomerate of finely ground stone. All whetstones are categorized according to grit, or coarseness. Rough stones have a lower grit count and are the first step in sharpening a particularly dull or chipped blade. Medium whetstones hover in the 800- to 2,000-grit range and are most often the first step in sharpening a knife. Whetstones with a grit count of 3,000 or above are referred to as finishing stones, and are used for refining and polishing.
It is believed that Vikings suspended these knife sharpening tools from their belt. However, it is not exactly clear, even to scholars, how the Vikings wore these pendants. We laced ours with a versatile, adjustable high-quality leather cord and packed it in a USA-made muslin pouch so you get to choose how to wear it or carry it. Wear it around the neck for the most Ragnariest looking necklace you’ve ever seen, cinch it all the way down so that it can be hitched to your belt or clipped onto your pack, or simply pocket it while still contained in the hand-stamped muslin pouch.
About a year ago, we wrote an article on why every man should carry a pocket knife. A lot of you out there agreed that the pocket knife deserves a permanent place in every man’s pocket. After we wrote the post, we started getting emails from men who were first time pocket knife owners asking how to sharpen their new prized possession. Well today we’re going to answer that question.
Thanks to the legacy at Kamikoto, I'm the proud owner of the last cooking knives I will ever need. Strong, perfectly balanced, comfortable and beautifully designed. Kamikoto has truly exceeded all expectations. Along with a superior product comes excellent customer service. Every inquiry was answered quickly and diligently. The moment these blades are removed from their casing you can feel the craftsmanship. But it's when you put them to the counter they truly sing. I will enjoy my Kamikoto blades for the rest of my life. Thank you from Hawaii !! Isaac S.
I use to work in the culinary industry and never finished my knives with a 6000-8000 grit (polishing) stone before. Mostly 2000 grit was good enough for me and I would usually run it by the stone every 2 weeks to keep the edge sharp. By no means do I see myself as a expert at sharpening knifes but it was a necessity and I can do it. I purchased this just to see if there was a difference and man is there. With a 2000 grit stone, you can still feel the burrs/slight edges that form from the sharpening process (especially if you didn't take care of your stone and formed a lot of uneven surface). You can see the removal of the burrs/edges after running your knife through this stone just on the first pass. It makes the knife buttery smooth and glide through food. Although I don't work in the restaurant business anymore, this stone has definitely improved the quality of my knifes and how I enjoy prepping meals at home.
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
Novaculite is a type of stone that can only be found in North America and in a limited geographical region of Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. The novacula stone formation in the Ouachitas of Central Arkansas is geologically considered, without a doubt, to be the purest and finest quality.  Its extremely high-purity silica content exceeds 99 percent. This Ouachita Mountain Novaculite is the only Novaculite we use in producing the FINEST whetstone sharpeners you can buy.
Ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without water or oil, which means they can be used almost anywhere and are ideal for chefs or cooks who have limited working spaces. They will give you a very sharp blade and as their surface is very hard they will maintain their flat surfaces over the long-term, but as they have a fine grit, they can break if you drop the stone.
This is the best sharpening stone of its kind for the money. It's conventional wisdom that proper sharpening requires starting from a coarse grit abrasive to remove blunted or mechanically fatigued metal before sharpening and polishing with progressively finer grits, however, in my experience it is generally less time consuming and more effective to use this stone for general purpose sharpening unless abnormally great care is needed. This stone is aggressive enough to produce noticeable results quickly yet it is fine enough to still be useful in refining knife edges to push cutting performance levels and polishing a knife's bevels to mirror like reflectivity (albeit deeper scratches in the metal will be visible unless you have successfully gone through the more traditional low to high progression of grit levels). This can be the only sharpening device for knives you will need unless you are in the business of making knives or sharpening large numbers of knives on other people's behalf.
This is a good quality stone for a beginner looking to learn about hand sharpening knives and blades. It holds up well, especially for the price point. New sharpeners are prone to gouging and scratching stones, pushing too hard, etc, and this stone handles the abuse nicely. The no slip base is very effective at cementing the stone in place, which is a critical safety feature.

Begin with your lower-grit stone. Place the heel of your knife on the far edge of the stone, holding the blade gently but firmly with both hands at a 15- to 20-degree angle. Using even pressure, slowly drag the knife over the stone toward you down the length of the stone while simultaneously moving the knife such that the contact point moves toward the tip of the blade.
Method 3: Use a Sharpening Stone. This is the best method by far. Not only will it give you the best edge, it also removes the least amount of material. With a fine enough grit, your knife should be able to take hairs off your arm when you've finished. Additionally—and I'm not kidding about the importance of this one—the act of sharpening your knife will help you create a much stronger bond with your blade, and a knife that is treated respectfully will behave much better for its owner. The only problem? It takes a little know-how.
4. Start sharpening the first side of the blade. With your blade set at the prefect angle, you’re ready to start sharpening. Imagine you’re carving off a slim piece of the stone’s surface. Personally, I bring the blade into the stone. Other people stroke the blade away from the stone. Both ways work, so just use whatever technique you prefer. If the knife blade is curved or if it’s longer than the stone, you’ll need to sweep the blade sideways as you work, so the entire edge is sharpened evenly. Apply moderate pressure as you sharpen. No need to bear down hard on the blade. After you make one stroke, start back at the beginning and repeat. Do this about 6-12 times.
The unique three stone system features a 6" medium Arkansas, 6" fine Arkansas and 6" coarse synthetic stone mounted on a molded plastic triangle with handles on the end for easy stone selection. The sturdy molded plastic base has non-skid rubber feet for safety, a V-shaped trough to catch oil drippings and easy-to- read stone identification markings.

Actually, the company contacted me to make sure I received the stones and that I was happy with them. Excellent service. The stones are great! I'm pretty much a novice so the clear instructions that came with the stones and the eBook instructions were wonderful. The eBook had quality pictures demonstrating the use of the stones and the written instructions were clear and to the point. Within minutes of opening the box I had the stones figured out and sharpening my AF survival knife, my pocket knife and a couple of my wife's kitchen knives...which included a very expensive chef's knife. Very satisfied with this product and highly recommend it.
We’ve shown you how to keep knives sharp before, and even discussed why water stones are best, but this crash course is quick, fast, and gets to the point. In most cases the most the average person at home can do is either hone their blade with a honing steel, which straightens and lines up the blade’s edge, but it doesn’t sharpen it. Alternatively you could run it through a handheld or electronic sharpener, but depending on the model you use it can do more harm than good.

These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.

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We’ve shown you how to keep knives sharp before, and even discussed why water stones are best, but this crash course is quick, fast, and gets to the point. In most cases the most the average person at home can do is either hone their blade with a honing steel, which straightens and lines up the blade’s edge, but it doesn’t sharpen it. Alternatively you could run it through a handheld or electronic sharpener, but depending on the model you use it can do more harm than good.
Whetstones are a gentle and an effective way to sharpen knives. WÜSTHOF whetstones consist of a combination of high-quality abrasive grits. Much like other sharpening techniques, whetstones offer a fine grit (honing) and a coarse grit (sharpening). The coarse grit is used to grind away material from the knife, allowing it to reset the edge. The fine grit can be used for regular maintenance or after sharpening in order to realign the microscopic teeth on the blade.
Historically, there are three broad grades of Japanese sharpening stones: the ara-to, or "rough stone", the naka-to or "middle/medium stone" and the shiage-to or "finishing stone". There is a fourth type of stone, the nagura, which is not used directly. Rather, it is used to form a cutting slurry on the shiage-to, which is often too hard to create the necessary slurry. Converting these names to absolute grit size is difficult as the classes are broad and natural stones have no inherent "grit number". As an indication, ara-to is probably (using a non-Japanese system of grading grit size) 500–1000 grit. The naka-to is probably 3000–5000 grit and the shiage-to is likely 7000–10000 grit. Current synthetic grit values range from extremely coarse, such as 120 grit, through extremely fine, such as 30,000 grit (less than half a micrometer abrasive particle size).[citation needed]
Works well. Just got it today, sharpened two pocket knives, one a 8Cr13MoV Chinese steel, the other s30v American steel The stone made short work of both steels (which were pretty sharp already). But notably was able to make the s30v hair shaving sharp easily, something I've had trouble with. Inexpensive and useful, I love this stone. It's not the Ninja sharp 8000+ grits that you can find, but for pocket knives and EDC, it's perfect and inexpensive. Get One!!!!!!!!!!!!
I can personally verify that this will get your knives very sharp. I will spare you all the gory details, but the picture is of the instructions the ER sent me home with after stopping the bleeding and patching me up. I have to say, that’s not what I had in mind regarding “Thanksgiving tips”. So: not only will knives slide easily through spinach, but they will go through finger and fingernail like a hot knife through butter after being sharpened by this whetstone. Very clean, straight cut. Impressive, really. Just take it slow and don’t be a moron like me.
I did a lot of research and bought this along with a diamond flat stone... and the henckles steel. The sharpest I got my knife (using a microscope to see the edge at 1000x) was using the diamonds stone up to 1000 grit, then straighten it with the steel, then use this stone to basically polish the knife. You are basically making the very very edge smooth and what this does is makes your blade last much longer before it needs sharpening. The edge of a knife looks like a hacksaw under a microscope so just picture making the teeth smaller. I will tell you if you use your knife on anything hard you just need a steel to realign the edge. You can do that about 5-10x before you need to sharpen it again. I learned a lot using a microscope to see the edge.
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