I give Sharp Pebble a top rating for two reasons. First, the company emailed a user guide for me to review and learn how to best use its product while it was being shipped to me. Wonderfully proactive. Second, the sharpening stone did a terrific job restoring the edge on my kitchen knives that had been woefully neglected. Ever rent a house and every knife in the kitchen has the edge of a butter knife? I was almost there. Now, the knives are cutting beautifully. I have only one suggestion for Sharp Pebble. While the stone includes a useful angle guide that can be attached to a blade and the guide gives clear steps on prepping the stone and how to hold the blade when sharpening, it does not illustrate the manner in which the blade needs to be moved across the stone. I had to go to Youtube to get some tips on the exact method. I have historically been very bad at putting an edge on a blade due to ignorance primarily. But with the help of the video and a good stone, I did an effective job. The base does a great job of holding the stone in place and is attractive in the kitchen.
This is an excellent stone for sharpening any knife especially given it has the two sides (1000 and 6000) so it’s basically 2 stones in one which cleaned up the dull edge of my favourite knife in no time. The knife guide takes all the guessing out of trying to work out the correct angle which I needed. The other thing about the Mikarto whetstone kit is the base which doubles up as the storage for the angle guide and fixing stone so you don’t loose them when stored away and also has a the rubber feet to stop it moving when being used no. I think it’s a bargain for the price especially with the amazing packaging which makes it perfect for a gift for anyone that likes cooking and loves their knives. Highly Recommend!
The stone should be durable: avoid knockoff models that are chipped or cracked. This is a serious concern when purchasing online, especially overseas. A quality whetstone should last a lifetime, and the price offered is a steal compared to the value. You may never have to replace expensive blades if you can simply sharpen a dull edge, and the stone pays for itself after only a few uses.

I give Sharp Pebble a top rating for two reasons. First, the company emailed a user guide for me to review and learn how to best use its product while it was being shipped to me. Wonderfully proactive. Second, the sharpening stone did a terrific job restoring the edge on my kitchen knives that had been woefully neglected. Ever rent a house and every knife in the kitchen has the edge of a butter knife? I was almost there. Now, the knives are cutting beautifully. I have only one suggestion for Sharp Pebble. While the stone includes a useful angle guide that can be attached to a blade and the guide gives clear steps on prepping the stone and how to hold the blade when sharpening, it does not illustrate the manner in which the blade needs to be moved across the stone. I had to go to Youtube to get some tips on the exact method. I have historically been very bad at putting an edge on a blade due to ignorance primarily. But with the help of the video and a good stone, I did an effective job. The base does a great job of holding the stone in place and is attractive in the kitchen.


Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 

I'm certainly not the most experienced knife sharpener our there, but these stones are effective. I've been able to sharpen all my kitchen knives to excellent edges with some practice. The packaging is great, and the manufacturing quality is exceptional. The only issue I've run into is that the silicon base doesn't stick very well to my quartz countertop, and has a tendency to slide a little while I use it, but that hasn't stopped me from using the product well, I just have to reposition the stone every few minutes.
I use to work in the culinary industry and never finished my knives with a 6000-8000 grit (polishing) stone before. Mostly 2000 grit was good enough for me and I would usually run it by the stone every 2 weeks to keep the edge sharp. By no means do I see myself as a expert at sharpening knifes but it was a necessity and I can do it. I purchased this just to see if there was a difference and man is there. With a 2000 grit stone, you can still feel the burrs/slight edges that form from the sharpening process (especially if you didn't take care of your stone and formed a lot of uneven surface). You can see the removal of the burrs/edges after running your knife through this stone just on the first pass. It makes the knife buttery smooth and glide through food. Although I don't work in the restaurant business anymore, this stone has definitely improved the quality of my knifes and how I enjoy prepping meals at home.
Low Grit Stones: A sharpening stone with grit number less than a 1000 is generally used for knives and tools that are damaged. If your blade has any nicks or chips in the blade, the stones will take care of them in a jiffy! They usually have a coarse side for nicks and chips, with the other side for general sharpening. Even if the knife’s edge has become totally blunt, the stone will re-sharpen it perfectly.
The newly designed dual-sided combination whetstone from Fallkniven features a super fine white ceramic stone (0, 1 micron) with a grit of 1400 to 2000 and the dark grey ceramic stone is made of synthetic sapphires (1 micron) and has a grit of 800-1000. There is no need to add any oil or water, just lay the blade on the stone, raise the blade's spine and deburr your blade on the grey side until it has a razor-sharp edge and then use the smooth white side to get a nice polished edge.

Whetstones are a gentle and an effective way to sharpen knives. WÜSTHOF whetstones consist of a combination of high-quality abrasive grits. Much like other sharpening techniques, whetstones offer a fine grit (honing) and a coarse grit (sharpening). The coarse grit is used to grind away material from the knife, allowing it to reset the edge. The fine grit can be used for regular maintenance or after sharpening in order to realign the microscopic teeth on the blade.

The whetstone, sometimes referred to as a honestone, was a common object in medieval London, and it was used primarily for sharpening knives and other blades. This particular whetstone is made of stone that is 145 millimeters in length and 11 millimeters wide. The object is wider near the top and narrows towards the base with a notch at its wider end. It should be noted that whetstones are usually uniform in width at their creation, but become weathered due to use. Whetstones, commonly used as they were, were easily worn down and replaced; this one was brought by merchants to be sold in London markets and was used to the point where its bottom side became several millimeters smaller than its top side. The stone used to make such an object was typically Norwegian Ragstone, which was shipped to London. The type of stone most ideal for whetstone production tended to be hard schist. These types of whetstones were created by specifically using stone that was taken from sections of quarries purposed for the production of whetstones. In general, quarries had access to different types of stone depending on their location, and these stones could be used for different items, mostly depending on properties such as hardness and grains present in the rock.
We regret that due to technical challenges caused by new regulations in Europe, we can for the time being no longer accept orders from the European Union. If you reside in the UK you can continue to order from our UK websites or shop from our locations and partners. Visit West Elm at www.westelm.co.uk and Pottery Barn Kids at www.potterybarnkids.co.uk.
These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
OUR UNIVERSAL WHETSTONES AREN’T JUST FOR KITCHEN KNIVES The Mikarto honing stones aren’t just ideal for kitchen knives; they can be used for just about anything with a blade. Designed to optimize the fluidity of your cutting device, our manual sharpening stone can be used for carving knives, hunting knives, butterfly knives, pocket knives, army knives, razor blades, scissors, pocket knives, or clippers. This multipurpose set is great as both an indoor and outdoor knife sharpener.
first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg
TO USE: Soak stone in water for no more than 5-10 minutes. Place stone on a damp cloth with the courser 400 grit side (dark green) facing up. Hold the knife so that it’s flat and perpendicular to the block, with the blade facing left. Holding the knife at a 20-degree angle, slowly sweep the edge of the blade from left to right down the length of the stone and continue until sharp. If stone starts to feel too dry, add more water. Be patient and take your time. Flip knife over and repeat on the other side (now moving from right to left). Be sure to sharpen both sides evenly. To polish the blade further, flip stone over to the fine 1000 grit side (light green) and repeat the process. When blade is honed to desired sharpness, wash and dry your knife. To clean your stone, simply rinse with water, wipe away any remaining metal residue with a rag, rinse again, then dry.
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