Whetstone has two different sides of grain for sharpening and polishing knife edges. These softer Japanese stones have several advantages over harder stones. Because they are softer, they do not become glazed or loaded with detritus. Plus, they are lubricated effectively with water rather than oil, but can be used with either. Submerge the stone in water for about 5 - 10 minutes. Continue to apply water while sharpening with the Whetstone Cutlery Two sided Whetstone Sharpening Stone. The stone releases small particles during the sharpening process; this powder in combination with water allows the sharpening. After a while you will notice a small burr at the edge. Now repeat the same process on the other side of the blade. Finally, turn the stone over and repeat the procedure, this time using the finer grit of the stone. In order to remove the remaining burr, pull the blade at an angle over the stone. Rinse the stone and clean off the grinding residue. Clean your knife with hot water.


You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 
I give Sharp Pebble a top rating for two reasons. First, the company emailed a user guide for me to review and learn how to best use its product while it was being shipped to me. Wonderfully proactive. Second, the sharpening stone did a terrific job restoring the edge on my kitchen knives that had been woefully neglected. Ever rent a house and every knife in the kitchen has the edge of a butter knife? I was almost there. Now, the knives are cutting beautifully. I have only one suggestion for Sharp Pebble. While the stone includes a useful angle guide that can be attached to a blade and the guide gives clear steps on prepping the stone and how to hold the blade when sharpening, it does not illustrate the manner in which the blade needs to be moved across the stone. I had to go to Youtube to get some tips on the exact method. I have historically been very bad at putting an edge on a blade due to ignorance primarily. But with the help of the video and a good stone, I did an effective job. The base does a great job of holding the stone in place and is attractive in the kitchen.
I don't really love or hate the plastic base that they come with, that seems to be somewhat polarizing in the reviews. I'm okay with it, and I'm fine that the stone is glued to it because I flatten the stones when I need to, but I can see why it would be nice to be able to flip the stone too. The rubber that they use for feet isn't the best at gripping when wet so get some kind of non-slip mat to put these on when you're sharpening to keep them from moving around.
Excellent wet stone for the home for someone with wet stone experience. Well designed plastic storage box doubles as stand for the wet stone. In use, the stone sits securely in a pliable gasket that fits in the plastic stand. Stone size is good for kitchen knives, dual grit works as advertised - lower number for cutting and higher number for finishing. Quickly put a keen edge on my knives. As this is a wet stone it is important to submerge the stone in water for about 10-15 minutes prior to use.and keep it wet during sharpening. It's a little messy to use and clean up is necessary to remove sharpening residue from knives, stone and surrounding area. Inexperienced sharpeners should use the angle guide provided in this kit and keep in mind it is far easier to keep a knife sharp than it is to put a sharp edge onto a very dull knife. I did not "register" with Makarto which is required to get their free Knife Sharpening Guide; instead I found instructions on the Web.
Whetstones may be natural or artificial stones. Artificial stones usually come in the form of a bonded abrasive composed of a ceramic such as silicon carbide (carborundum) or of aluminium oxide (corundum). Bonded abrasives provide a faster cutting action than natural stones. They are commonly available as a double-sided block with a coarse grit on one side and a fine grit on the other enabling one stone to satisfy the basic requirements of sharpening. Some shapes are designed for specific purposes such as sharpening scythes, drills or serrations.[9]

OUR PRODUCT COMES WITH MORE THAN A WHETSTONE Along with your edge sharpener stone, you receive a cleaning and lapping stone to ensure the sharpening block surface is always at peak performance. It also comes with an angle guide that steadies your knife for an optimal sharpening technique. Both stones and the guide stand come in a high-quality non-slip plastic box with holes to keep the products safe and dry. With our deluxe set, you won’t need anything else to keep your knives in prime shape.
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