There are many methods to sharpen your knives. For example, you can use a sharppening stone, or a sharpening rod, sharpening system or an electrical sharpening machine. You can also ask someone else to do the job. The best sharpening method for you, depends on the kind of knives you want to sharpen, the type of steel of the blade, your experience with sharpening and your own preferences.
After testing nine honing rods, both steel and ceramic, we think the Idahone 12″ fine ceramic rod is best for most kitchens. We were looking for a tool that kept knives of all styles sharp, from 4-inch paring knives to 12-inch chef’s knives. We wanted one that worked equally well on German and Japanese blades, which are made of softer and harder steels, respectively. We also wanted to pay less than $40. The Idahone met all our requirements. Its surface was noticeably smoother than that of the other three ceramic models we tried, yet rapidly restored the edges of all the knives we tested. It also removed less material from the blades, which will help to prolong their working lives. And compared with the five steel honing rods we tested, the Idahone was gentler on the blades.

We have been helping customers find the right sharpeners for more than a decade. Selecting a sharpener can be difficult if you're not sure what you need. Our staff is trained to listen to your needs and to help you find the right sharpener the first time. We understand that it may be your first time sharpening, so we're available to help you if you have questions. Even if you're already a sharpening professional, our staff is available to answer your tough questions. We use what we sell, so you can be assured that when you purchase from us, we're able to help you with your sharpener.
You will also need at least one finer stone. Once the shape of an edge is established, successively finer grits are used to refine the edge improving the quality of the cut it delivers. A dull edge will not cut well and should be shaped with a coarse stone. An edge sharpened on a coarse stone will cut better than a dull one, but still won’t be ideal and should be improved with a finer stone. As you progress through finer stones, the cutting edge will continue to improve. How many and how fine these stones need to be varies depending on how fine an edge you require.

Most electric sharpeners use a 2 or 3 step process to create, sharpen and hone the edge of your blade. The first step in the sharpening process involves using a coarse grit, which sharpens extremely dull or damaged blades. The last step in the process uses a fine grit, which hones the blade to the desired finish. When an electric sharpener is turned on, it spins the sharpening stones. These stones sharpen the knife placed in the slots, to the desired sharpness. Most of them come with guides, which allow you to obtain the perfect angle. This makes them popular since they simplify the whole process of sharpening knives.
Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.

When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
If your whetstone needs to be soaked, submerge it in water until it's completely saturated and there are no bubbles coming out of it, 5 to10 minutes. To use it, hold the knife at a 20-degree angle against the whetstone, and gently drag each side of the knife against it a few times. Most whetstones have both a "coarse-grind side" and a "fine-grind side"—start with the coarse side if your knife is especially dull, then repeat the process on the fine-grind side.
This three stone package is a good place to look if a larger surface area in oilstones is what you’re after. The 11 1/2" long by 2 1/2" wide Coarse Crystolon, Medium India and Soft Arkansas stones provide more work surface than the smaller oil stones giving flexibility to sharpen knives and many other tools as well. The plastic housing retains the oil, keeping the stones bathed and ready to go.
Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
Heres why I wasn't impressed at first. I only used it for a few minutes on each side, which resulted in nothing. I watched a video online with a master chef using his stone, and he sharpened his knife for 10 minutes on each stone before moving up to a finer grit. I took this hint, and used sharpened my knife on each side of this stone for 10 minutes, which led to perfection.
While it may still feel like there is a lot to choose from, you don’t need a lot of of stones, you just a several good varieties to choose from. To summarize I will indicate below what my favourite stones are in each grit. Yes you can mix up the brands when sharpening but my recommendation is to buy a combination of 2-3 stones of the same brand and go from there.
This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set.

The knives sharpening system is multifunctional. It has three slots for ceramic knives, dull metal knives and a slot for finishing and polishing the edges. It is very safe to use. Hence, no need to worry about accidents or to damage your blades in the process of sharpening. The base is non-slip in nature due to the heavy duty non-slip rubber used. This provides extra grip thus boosting its safety. The main body is light and yet durable at the same time.
4. Start sharpening the first side of the blade. With your blade set at the prefect angle, you’re ready to start sharpening. Imagine you’re carving off a slim piece of the stone’s surface. Personally, I bring the blade into the stone. Other people stroke the blade away from the stone. Both ways work, so just use whatever technique you prefer. If the knife blade is curved or if it’s longer than the stone, you’ll need to sweep the blade sideways as you work, so the entire edge is sharpened evenly. Apply moderate pressure as you sharpen. No need to bear down hard on the blade. After you make one stroke, start back at the beginning and repeat. Do this about 6-12 times.
Every finished product you serve to your customers goes through a number of steps from growing, harvesting, and shipping to receiving, prepping, and serving. In each one of these steps, potential food safety hazards that might sicken or injure the final consumer are present. However, with careful planning, these hazards can be prevented, reduced to safe levels, or even eliminated altogether. Keep reading to learn what a HACCP plan is and the steps needed to create your own. What does HACCP Stand For? HACCP stands for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. It is a system restaurant operators put in place to help them identify and react to dangerous biological, chemical, or physical food contamination. The goal of this food management s
Generally speaking, this type of knife sharpener is designed for someone with a little bit of experience in the craft of knife sharpening. To sharpen your blade, simply swipe it along the rough, textured surface in a sweeping motion, being sure to hold it at the proper angle. Holding it at the proper angle can be quite difficult. Despite looking very basic and simple, this is actually one of the more difficult types of manual knife sharpeners to use. That being said, with a little practice almost anyone can learn how to use it effectively.
It is designed to help sharpen straight bladed knives that are made of steel. It cannot be used on ceramic and serrated edges. The two sharpening modes guarantee the user gets the best service from it. It has been designed with the users’ safety in mind. This is due to the large grip handle and the non-slip feet. It has an attractive design that makes it a great addition to any kitchen.
Unlike my choice for Best Manual Sharpener, the Chef’s Choice 15 was a slam dunk for the category of Best Electric Sharpener. Not only does it come fully loaded with almost everything you could think of, it also received extremely positive consumer reviews. As usual, it will take a little more space to tell you about something as awesome as this knife sharpener.
Although the Trizor XV is easy to use, you have to use it correctly. That means sharpening one side of the blade at a time until a burr forms, whereas a back-and-forth, one-side-and-then-the-other approach might seem more intuitive. (Don’t worry—the Trizor XV’s manual explains the process plainly.) Maintenance is easy: Once a year or so, you open the bin on the machine’s underside and wipe out the metal shavings that it has conveniently captured there with a magnet.

4. Start sharpening the first side of the blade. With your blade set at the prefect angle, you’re ready to start sharpening. Imagine you’re carving off a slim piece of the stone’s surface. Personally, I bring the blade into the stone. Other people stroke the blade away from the stone. Both ways work, so just use whatever technique you prefer. If the knife blade is curved or if it’s longer than the stone, you’ll need to sweep the blade sideways as you work, so the entire edge is sharpened evenly. Apply moderate pressure as you sharpen. No need to bear down hard on the blade. After you make one stroke, start back at the beginning and repeat. Do this about 6-12 times.
Like most sharpeners, this one is not equipped to handle scissors or serrated blades. Also unfortunate is the fact that, despite searching and searching for information, I was unable to discover this machine’s sharpening angle. Usually, it is safe to assume that sharpeners with unmentioned angles will be best suited to American and European-style knives, but I cannot say for certain.
We have been helping customers find the right sharpeners for more than a decade. Selecting a sharpener can be difficult if you're not sure what you need. Our staff is trained to listen to your needs and to help you find the right sharpener the first time. We understand that it may be your first time sharpening, so we're available to help you if you have questions. Even if you're already a sharpening professional, our staff is available to answer your tough questions. We use what we sell, so you can be assured that when you purchase from us, we're able to help you with your sharpener.
Certain knife sharpeners require you to spend up to 15 minutes of your life, just to get the edge or sharpness that you desire. If you are a busy individual, you may not have all that time in your life, and that is where the SunrisePro Knife Sharpener comes in. It makes the whole process of sharpening a knife easy and fast. It doesn’t matter how dull or damaged your blade is, this machine gets the job done within a few seconds.
If style and interior décor are important to you and you intend to leave your sharpener on the countertop, you will be happy to hear that this Chef’s Choice is available in six stunning colors. The colors include black, white, red, chrome, brushed metal, and platinum. Though they may not be the best matches for many country or vintage-style homes, these sharpeners will look fantastic on the countertop in an urban, industrial, or modern-style home.
Although there are many ways to sharpen your kitchen knives, we believe that using a sharpening stone is the absolute best way to go about it. Not only will you get the best results, you won’t assume as much risk of damaging the blade as you would using a manual or electric knife sharpener. The problem for most home cooks, however, is finding the best sharpening stone and learning how to use it. I’m not going to pretend it’s as easy as purchasing a stone and digging right in.
The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.
When you sharpen a Buck Knife properly it will perform the way it was meant to. Never sharpen your knife on a power-driven grinding wheel not specifically designed for that purpose. You could burn the temper from your blade making the edge brittle and prone to chips or cracks. This also voids the warranty. The first step to knife sharpening is to pick a sharpener.
Ye olde tomato test - After you have sharpened using one of the above sharpeners grab a firm tomato and try to slice it. If the blade is properly sharpened it will slice through the skin with virtually no effort and without pushing the skin inward first. If the skin is able to fight back against the blade then your knives are not properly sharpened yet.
Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
Truly meant for honing, this rod features deep grooves which extend the length of the rod. As you sweep your blade along these grooves they will gently work to pull its edge back into proper alignment, making it stronger, straighter and allowing it to stay sharp for longer. Consumers appear to be very happy with this rod’s performance and construction. Their reviews give off an overwhelming impression that this rod is reliable and gets the job done right (so long as you know how to use a honing rod). 

In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
Before we start, I want to make clear that there are dozens of different ways to sharpen a knife. Everyone has a way they think is best, and men have all sorts  of techniques and tools that they feel are essential in getting a sharp blade. In the end, much of it comes down to personal preference. I’m going to show you the way I learned how to sharpen a pocket knife. It’s very basic, good for beginners, and best of all, it works. If you have an alternative method that you prefer, great. Share it with us in the comments. I’d love to hear your tips.

This coarse grit whetstone is great for prepping old and dull knives that need to be sharpened with a fine grit stone. One of my good knives edge looked like someone had tried to chop barbed wire. After ten minutes on each side of the stone, the edge was smooth and free of imperfections. After it hit the knife with the fine grit stone, I was cutting onions and apples like hot butter! I would soak this stone for 12-24 hours before using. It sucks water like a sponge. The surface needs to be damp when you sharpen.


This rod features no abrasions. Instead, it features long grooves. This tells me that it has been made for honing, not sharpening. That is okay, though, because that is what most people look to a rod for – its honing ability. Unlike the Wusthof, which was awarded “Best Rod”, this Winware is not magnetic. That is also okay, though, since this rod is made strictly for honing and will not need to grip onto any metal shards, as no metal shards will be removed from the blade during the honing process.

Manual sharpeners are, in my opinion, the best way to sharpen your knives. They are my personal favorite, because they allow you to sharpen your blades with precision. Unlike electric sharpeners which can take off layers of steel so quickly you barely see it happen, you maintain control over the sharpening process with a manual sharpener. You can put one pass through, then check your edge. You can do another pass or two, then check it again.
A: That depends almost entirely on how often you use them. If you are a professional chef who uses his or her knives every day then you should hone them every time you use your knives. But honing has its limits and over time your edge is going to become dull no matter what. Therefore your knives will need to be sharpened at least several times a year. Some chefs, in fact, will use a whetstone on an almost daily basis in order to ensure their knives are always razor sharp. Most of us, however, are not professional chefs and may not even touch our kitchen knives for days at a time. In that case, it’s probably a good idea to hone the edge after every couple of uses and have your knives sharpened once a year.
I recommend keeping two stones in your kit. One with a medium grit (around 800 or so) to perform major sharpening jobs, and one with a fine grit (at least 2,000) to tune the edge to a razor-sharp finish. For real pros, a stone with an ultra-fine grit (8,000 and above) will leave a mirror-like finish on your blade, but most cooks won't notice the difference in terms of cutting ability.
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 

Whetstone has two different sides of grain for sharpening and polishing knife edges. These softer Japanese stones have several advantages over harder stones. Because they are softer, they do not become glazed or loaded with detritus. Plus, they are lubricated effectively with water rather than oil, but can be used with either. Submerge the stone in water for about 5 - 10 minutes. Continue to apply water while sharpening with the Whetstone Cutlery Two sided Whetstone Sharpening Stone. The stone releases small particles during the sharpening process; this powder in combination with water allows the sharpening. After a while you will notice a small burr at the edge. Now repeat the same process on the other side of the blade. Finally, turn the stone over and repeat the procedure, this time using the finer grit of the stone. In order to remove the remaining burr, pull the blade at an angle over the stone. Rinse the stone and clean off the grinding residue. Clean your knife with hot water.
A blade's sharpness may be tested by checking if it "bites"—begins to cut by being drawn across an object without pressure. Specialized sticks exist to check bite, though one can also use a soft ballpoint pen, such as the common white Bic Stic. A thumbnail may be used[3] at the risk of a cut, or the edge of a sheet of paper. For kitchen knives, various vegetables may be used to check bite, notably carrots, tomatoes, or cucumbers. In testing in this way, any nicks are felt as obstacles.
Manufacturer contacted and sent a new one for replacement. Great customer service but replacement item was nicked on the corner. It was still usable so i didn't bother to ask for another replacement. I would recommend item to be shipped in another box instead of an over-sized yellow envelop which is not adequate protection. Item sharpen my knife pretty good though..

Electric machine: An electric knife sharpener offers the most convenient sharpening tool design. You'll pull the knife blade through the guide slot on the machine, and a motor applies the sharpening agent (usually a sharpening stone) to the metal blade. Many electric sharpeners will offer multiple guide slots that run from coarse to fine sharpening or that handle different blade angles.
Begin by sharpening the knife from the front side. Sharpening is completed when the knife has an even burr. Only use a flat-surfaced stone to finish the back surface of the blade. Sharpen the blade from the edge to the spine. Do not sharpen at too great an angle between the blade and the stone. The stone used to finish the cutting edge of the blade should contact the edge evenly.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.
The coarse stone will cut the metal off quicker but it is going to give you a rougher edge but that way the job gets done quicker, without the oil. It is not as messy. This is just a real simple set up. If you do wood work you can make a little wooden box and rout it out. In this particular case it is just a 2x4, stone traced out, finishing nails tapped down so they are deeper than the stone so when you drop the stone in, if you are at a workbench you can C-clamp it down in place or you can hold on to it.
Place an old coffee mug upside down so that the bottom of the mug is exposed to the air. In a pinch, a coffee mug can serve as a surprisingly effective sharpening tool if you don't have any fancy equipment. The ceramic material of a mug is a material coarse enough to get good results. Indeed, some honing rods even use ceramic material to keep a blade homed in between sharpenings.
Our second entry from Chef’s Choice is the 463 Pronto Santoku. This manual sharpener is super-simple to use and delivers fast, high quality results every time. While this is a “2-stage” system there’s nothing complicated about it. One slot is for sharpening and the other for honing. Both stages utilize diamond abrasive surfaces so your blades will retain its edge for a good long time.
This impressive Chef’s Choice sharpener is not the only Chef’s Choice sharpener on this list. That must tell you something about its quality. I must say that I was very impressed with this sharpener. It features three stages: rough, fine, and hone. The first two stages use sharpening discs with diamond flecks as abrasives. They gently file down your blade, bringing it to a smoother, sharper point. Stage three features patented honing and polishing discs designed to straighten your blade for the sharpest, cleanest cuts possible. Its rubber feet keep it firmly planted upon your countertop for an easy and safe sharpening process.
The stone – With a sharpening stone, the process is essentially the same as with the stick sharpener. The only difference is that you don’t hold the stone, you place it into its own holder (If it comes with one. If it doesn’t you’ll need to improvise) on a flat surface. Push the knife down the stone several times while holding it at a shallow angle and then flip it and pull it toward you several times to get the other side of the blade.
Begin by sharpening the knife from the front side. Sharpening is completed when the knife has an even burr. Only use a flat-surfaced stone to finish the back surface of the blade. Sharpen the blade from the edge to the spine. Do not sharpen at too great an angle between the blade and the stone. The stone used to finish the cutting edge of the blade should contact the edge evenly.
A: People often make the mistake of assuming that just because a mechanical knife sharpener will sharpen the edge of a knife that means it will sharpen any type of cutting edge, including scissors. This is a mistake and can wind up being a costly mistake when you have to replace both your scissors and the knife sharpener. There are sharpening devices specifically designed to handle scissors. Or you can bring your scissors to a sharpening pro who will usually have the right equipment on hand to also sharpen scissors. Another thing to keep in mind about trying to use a sharpener to sharpen scissors is that by using the device in this fashion you are likely voiding the warranty. As such if you damage the device trying to sharpen scissors you’ll need to pay to have it repaired or replaced as the warranty won’t cover it. Also, certain types of high end scissors also come with a warranty. And, just as with the sharpener itself, if you try to sharpen them using a mechanical sharpener you can say goodbye to the warranty protection. The bottom line is to always use the appropriate tool for the job at hand. That way you’re assured of the best possible result and any warranty remains in effect.

In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
When I set out to look for the Best Electric Knife Sharpener, I told myself that I needed to find one which would make someone’s life easier. I didn’t want to just pick something because it was affordable, because a lot of people liked it, or because it did one really cool thing. I wanted it to be a stable piece of machinery built to actually improve someone’s life.

This package includes a bamboo base to hold the stone, a premium quality whetstone (#1000 / #6000), a simple instruction manual, a knife sharpening angle guide and a detailed eBook that will help the beginners to learn the basic and advanced tips about effective knife sharpening.This special stone has versatile uses. You can use it to sharp scissors, kitchen knives, hunting knives and pocket knives too.
In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.

Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil!
I can personally verify that this will get your knives very sharp. I will spare you all the gory details, but the picture is of the instructions the ER sent me home with after stopping the bleeding and patching me up. I have to say, that’s not what I had in mind regarding “Thanksgiving tips”. So: not only will knives slide easily through spinach, but they will go through finger and fingernail like a hot knife through butter after being sharpened by this whetstone. Very clean, straight cut. Impressive, really. Just take it slow and don’t be a moron like me.
I have had 20 different knife sharpeners in the past, including two that are the motorized type, as well as the manual stones, and the types that clamps are used to sharpen knifes. I have some nice and expensive knives I use in the kitchen as well for recreational use. This one is by far the best one to use for the kitchen. I have not tried it any Swiss Army knife type blades, but it does very well with my Victorinox kitchen knives. I highly recommend this sharpener. It is rather large but I actually like the fact that it is large as you can then hold it better. Also, try not to push the knife down on the sharpener, but instead use a steady motion, with minimal pressure and you will see small particles sharpened off. The knob above has presets for kitchen as well as hunting knives. This sharpener is well worth its price as the sharpening blades are easily removable. The pictures don't show it well but once you pull out the knob, the gray plastic cover easily comes off and the blades are held by the yellow pieces by screws. I have not yet found replacements but I don't think I will need them soon. The blades are still sharp after sharpening 20 knives. I sharpened my main santoku knife, chefs knifes and serrated steak knives and I was very impressed. Highly recommended.
Today, however, there is a whole new generation of mechanical sharpeners that are far more forgiving for those who may not use perfect technique. At the same time many more people have become accustomed to sharpening their knives this way and the average novice of 10 years ago is now the seasoned pro. It is still possible to damage knives with an electric sharpener, but you would have to either be trying to damage the knife or have some type of accident in order to do so.
Unlike our Top Choice for this category, most rods are actually made only to hone your blade, not to sharpen it as well. To hone something means to straighten it. The very thin cutting edge of any blade will become warped over time. It will not be visible to the naked eye, but it will be warped. Tiny folds and grooves will find their way to your blade’s edge, making it seem as if it is growing dull. Using a honing rod, you can push those folds back into place and create a straighter, stronger, sharper blade. Of course, this will only work for so long, as your blade will eventually grow dull in other ways. 
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