Sugimoto Hamono Western kitchen knives are made from carbon steel or special alloy steel. Although carbon steel knives cut well and are easy to sharpen, they rust easily. Carbon steel knives are also discolored by some foods, but this is not a problem with special alloy steel knives. The Western-style kitchen knife is often referred to as a “general-purpose knife” and is widely used.
The Juuma sharpening and honing stones offer a simplified working principle while at the same time ensuring the highest possible quality in the offered grits. Juuma Cobalt Blue stones are made of an aluminium oxide and a bonding agent. Adding cobalt serves to slow stone abrasion and increase the speed of sharpening. The speed bonus is especially marked when stoning blue steel (blue paper steel that is often used for Japanese planes and chisels). The cobalt gives the stones their blue colour. Juuma is our proprietary brand. Juuma sharpening stones are produced by a renowned Japanese whetstone manufacturer.
Sharpening is really two processes: Grinding and honing. Grinding is simply the removal of metal. Honing is a precision abrasion process in which a relatively small amount of material is removed from the surface by the means of abrasive stones. Once you have the right shape, usually using a more aggressive grit, you then switch to a finer grit to hone the edge.
When you sharpen a Buck Knife properly it will perform the way it was meant to. Never sharpen your knife on a power-driven grinding wheel not specifically designed for that purpose. You could burn the temper from your blade making the edge brittle and prone to chips or cracks. This also voids the warranty. The first step to knife sharpening is to pick a sharpener.

A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.

This safe and easy to use sharpener offers two stages of sharpening (COARSE and FINE) for all types of knives with a flat grind on both sides of the blade and a fixed-angle slot for sharpening serrated edge blades. It also offers more sharpening angles than any Precision Sharpening System on the market today and eliminates the need to keep up with all the pieces that come in a Precision kit. It has an soft grip handle and non-slip rubber feet for comfort and safety.


This knife sharpener features precision-ground tungsten-carbide sharpener on bars which can automatically adjust to provide different blade angles. And just by changing hand positions, you can easily fine-sharp or hone the knife as often as you like. With regular honing, you will maintain a sharp edge without removing metal and extending the lifetime of the blade.
To take off the fine scratches and burrs left by coarser stones, and to polish the surface, you can use stones starting at around 2000 grit. There is theoretically no upper limit, but stones above about 10000 grit achieve practically no measurable improvement in the edge. It is also interesting to note that above 8000 grit, there is no Japanese measurement standard. For stones labelled as having a finer grit, you simply have to take the manufacturer's word for it.

By employing separate sharpening slots, the ProntoPro 4643 is capable of sharpening both older European-style knives (such as from Wüsthof and Henckels) and Japanese-style knives (such as from Mac—which makes our favorite chef’s knife—and Shun). The difference is in the angle of the bevel that forms the cutting edge: Traditional European knives have roughly 20-degree bevels, while Japanese knives have roughly 15-degree ones. If you own both types of knife, or if you do a lot of heavy work in the kitchen (like chopping up chicken carcasses), you’ll appreciate this feature, as a 20-degree bevel is best for tough jobs. Note, though, that Wüsthof and Henckels have stopped making 20-degree knives, having switched to 15-degree or 12-degree designs exclusively in 2011; the reason is that for all but the heaviest tasks, these more-acute bevels cut better and, with the ongoing improvements in steel alloys, hold their edges for just as long.
The speed and polishing ability of waterstones attract many sharpeners. Waterstones sharpen quickly and are available in fine polishing grits not found in other stone types. The ability to flatten the stones is a necessity when sharpening with waterstones, so a starting set should include a flattening stone of some kind. Our article, How to Flatten a Waterstone, has more information about keeping waterstones flat.
So you are going to start at the heel and you are going to time it so that it goes all the way across. You go from one side to the other. You also want to make sure that your stone, I am not going to use as much pressure as I normally would because I cannot mount it on this showcase, you want to alternate from side to side to keep your bevel centered. Some people will take and do three times on one side and then three times on the other, the problem is that your backhand is never as good as your forehand and you end up cheating and you are going to end up with a blade that is offset. That is going to take it and thin down, you are going to get a thin bevel right on the edge. Once you get that V established, you can go from the coarser side to the finer side.
You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...

The Adjustable Angle Pull-Thru Knife Sharpener will sharpen all your knives (hunting, kitchen, and pocket) at the same angle as the original factory grind. Stop messing with the complex, cumbersome, and time-consuming Precision Sharpening Kits and get a simple, easy to use knife sharpener that offers more angles and sharpens both sides of the knife blade at the same time.


http://www.youtube.com/user/MakeSushi1 is all about how to make sushi, we pride ourselves on creating new exciting sushi roll recipes and then sharing them with the world. In our video tutorials we will teach you how to do all a basics of making sushi and create innovative sushi rolls, sashimi, nigiri sushi and possibly might create a new category of sushi , who knows. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be notified of our weekly sushi videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...
Sharpening is really two processes: Grinding and honing. Grinding is simply the removal of metal. Honing is a precision abrasion process in which a relatively small amount of material is removed from the surface by the means of abrasive stones. Once you have the right shape, usually using a more aggressive grit, you then switch to a finer grit to hone the edge.

However, due to limited natural deposits and extensive quarrying over the centuries, true, high quality, Japanese water stones are now few and far between and are very expensive. Thus, various companies are now producing synthetic Japanese Water Stones which generally have a more consistent composition and grit size than natural stones as well as often begin somewhat harder and thus, lasting a bit longer; not to mention being cheaper to purchase.


There really is no point in having amazing knives if you don’t keep them sharp. Bert from TOG Knives has spent years experimenting with different sharpening methods and bits of equipment to work out the absolute best way to sharpen TOG Knives. If you follow the advice below we guarantee you will become a sharpening Ninja. Watch this space as we’ll be adding more videos in the future…
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