Although it is slightly expensive than other tool sharpeners, this one saves you quite some precious time. It is one of the fastest ways to get all your blades sharpened. In addition, you just need to spend a few hours with it, and you will learn its entire operational procedure. Avoid excessive sharpening, since it might leave scratches on the blade’s surface.
Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.
Most sharpening stones are made of aluminum oxide, Novaculite, and silicon carbide. They are commonly known as India, Arkansas and Crystolon stones. Crystolon and India are man made while Arkansas stones are natural. Arkansas stones have a fine to coarse texture while India stones are preferred for fine sharpening. Crystolon are mainly used for initial coarse sharpening. Some sharpening stones are mixed with diamond abrasives to produce the optimal cutting edge.
Ability to sharpen knives by hand: There’s something to be said about running the tool over the blade with your own hands and feeling the abrasive wheels reshape and refresh the knife. Some believe that an electric knife sharpener is too aggressive with its sharpening, and can damage or ruin the blade, thus having control of the speed and pressure is important.
The Brød & Taylor Pocket Knife Sharpener (which is no longer available) uses the same carbide stones as the full-size model noted above, and it sharpens and hones just as well. It would make a solid, pocketable tool for campers, hunters, and anglers. But this compact model is not stable enough for long or heavy kitchen knives, and you can’t engage the spring-loaded arms in order to use a polishing function.

The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.
So, as you can see, there are numerous different types and grades of whetstones on the market today and each has its advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, the right practice to choose the right sharpening stone for you is to choose a whetstone material based upon how fast you need to remove metal and how fine an edge you need. For instance, although they are often the most expensive type of whetstone, diamond hones generally cut the fastest even in their finer grits followed by Crystolon Stones and then India Stones which are then generally followed by Japanese Water Stones and then by Novaculite, Belgian Blue, and Coticule whetstones in terms of how fast they remove metal. However, it should also be noted that the rougher an edge is, the less sharp it is while, the more polished an edge is, the sharper it is and thus, rough edges are fine for some tools while other tools require a much finer edge and, hunting knives require the finest edge of all. Therefore, the trick to choosing the proper whetstone for any given sharpening purpose is to purchase multiple stones with varying grits to accomplish each given task from cutting an initial bevel or defining a damaged edge to refining an existing edge to polishing it. We hope this article helped you. Feel free to leave a comment below if you have questions.
Truly meant for honing, this rod features deep grooves which extend the length of the rod. As you sweep your blade along these grooves they will gently work to pull its edge back into proper alignment, making it stronger, straighter and allowing it to stay sharp for longer. Consumers appear to be very happy with this rod’s performance and construction. Their reviews give off an overwhelming impression that this rod is reliable and gets the job done right (so long as you know how to use a honing rod).
However, because the Belgian Blue stone generally occurs in relatively wide columns with much thinner layers of Vielsalm Coticule on either side adjacent to the slate, the Belgian Blue stone is more plentiful that Coticule and thus, it’s somewhat less expensive. But, it’s also somewhat softer than Coticule and is not divided into different grades as Coticule is. Furthermore, because it is a softer stone than Coticule, it is sold without a substrate layer.
I have this one and the axe/machete version as well. These are great sharpeners that make very short work of getting blades sharp. They take off quite a lot of material and are quite different than most other stone sharpeners I have used in the past, so I try to be conservative with my pressure as you see the chips fall when you pull the knife through. But, they absolutely work, and work very well. If you have a high use knife, this is a great way to keep it sharp and in service all the time. I use my large bushcraft knife a lot more now that I have this since I can sharpen it much faster and easier. I would not use this sharpener on precision instruments just because I prefer more control and try to preserve material on those types on knives. But, bottom line, I get more work done and much faster now that I have this.
The word “Novaculite” is derived from the Latin word “novacula”, which means “razor stone” and is essentially a metamorphic, recrystallized, variety of Chert composed mostly of microcrystalline quartz that is found in the found in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma and in the Marathon Uplift of  Deposited in the Devonian Period and the early Mississippian Subperiod some 410 to 325 million years ago and subjected to uplift and folding during the Ouachita orogeny of the Atokan Epoch (early Pennsylvanian Subperiod), Novaculite is a very tough stone that is resistant to erosion and thus, the various layers of Novaculite stand out as ridges in the Ouachita Mountains. Thus, due to both its availability and its composition, it has been mined since ancient times for use as arrowheads and spear heads as well as in more modern times for use as sharpening stones.
This sharpener includes five different sharpening stones along with a knife clamp that holds the knife during sharpening, and a guide that allows you to select the proper blade angle. Honing oil is also included. The stones have finger grips for a secure hold and are color coded so you know which are coarser and which are finer. Unlike traditional whetstones, with this system the knife remains still while you move the stones along the blade. This manual system allows you to sharpen knives at four different angles, but requires some practice to become comfortable with the technique.
Looking for the best manual knife sharpener that’s easy to use and effective? Then consider getting the Brod & Taylor Professional which is a home foolproof knife sharpener that has a unique design to effectively sharpen smooth and serrated knives. Consumers find it very easy to use, sharpens all types of knives, sturdy that’s built to last, and quite attractive to sit on the counter.

The Presto EverSharp 08800 electric knife sharpener gets great reviews. In our test, though, its flimsy motor instantly bogged down when our knife contacted its sharpening wheels—and even light pressure threatened to stop the the sharpening wheels entirely. The high, wide guide frames meant it couldn’t sharpen the last ¾ inch of a blade, an unacceptable shortcoming. We’ll take our experience over the reviews.

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