Consumers have stated that a lot of metal is removed from the blade if you use all three stages. Usually, however, it is completely unnecessary to use all three stages. Most of the time you can easily get away with only using the fine grit and the honing discs to sharpen your knives. You can even use the honing discs on their own to keep your blades straight. The first stage (the rough grit) will only be necessary for sharpening extremely dull or damaged blades. Upon completing this stage, you will often find that you can skip right over to honing.

I recommend keeping two stones in your kit. One with a medium grit (around 800 or so) to perform major sharpening jobs, and one with a fine grit (at least 2,000) to tune the edge to a razor-sharp finish. For real pros, a stone with an ultra-fine grit (8,000 and above) will leave a mirror-like finish on your blade, but most cooks won't notice the difference in terms of cutting ability.


The humble sharpener tends to elicit more divergent opinions than just about any other type of kitchen tech. Everyone, it turns out, has their own take on which type of sharpener works best and why and most serious chefs aren’t shy about voicing their opinion. As you can imagine then there are a number of things most chefs – both professional and amateur – look for in a sharpener in order to ensure they get the one that’s right for them. These considerations include:
This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO performs double duty as a knife sharpener and a tool sharpener. Its ability to perform multiple tasks is part of why this sharpener looks so intimidating. Instead of using spinning discs like most electric sharpeners, this Work Sharp uses belts. In fact, it works a lot like a typical electric sander. A motor pulls the belts along so that they gently shave away at whatever you place them against.

The Adjustable Angle Pull-Thru Knife Sharpener offers new, innovative features never used on a manual knife sharpener and functional performance unmatched by standard edge maintenance products. This sharpener offers two stages of sharpening (COARSE and FINE) for all types of straight edge knives with a grind on both sides of the blade and a fixed-angle slot for sharpening serrated edge blades. It will sharpen a wide variety of knives by simply adjusting the angle of the abrasive components to match the angle of the original factory grind. Just turn the dial to one of the 6 angles offered, then pull your knife through the appropriate slot(s). It?s that easy! Stop messing with those difficult to use, cumbersome, and timely Precision Sharpening Kits and get an Adjustable Angle Pull-Thru Knife Sharpener from Smith?s®.
Start off on the rough grit side of the stone. Check the grit on your stone, or the packaging that came with the stone, to identify which is which. In general, whetstones and diamond stones each have different grits on either side. The rough grit side is used to grind the steel down, while the fine grit side is used to sharpen or hone the knife. The grinding process comes first, so you start on the rough grit side.
Oil Stones differ from water stones in that they require the use of honing oil to float the swarf (metal particles). Also, these stones are commonly made from one of three different materials consisting of Novaculite, Aluminum Oxide (Corundum), or Silicon Carbide (Carborundum) and they all use oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf in order to prevent the stone from becoming clogged. Also, while Novaculite and Coticule are the most traditional types of oil stones, there are also synthetic oil stones made by the Norton abrasives company called “India Oil Stones”.
This is a good size stone and has the two different grits needed for knife sharpening. No instructions were included, but there are many websites with written and video instructions, so this is not an issue for most people. A fair amount of dust is generated during the sharpening process, so protect the work surface and wash the knife after sharpening is completed.
Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
If the blade is only slightly dull, using a steel rod, called knife sharpening steel, can give the edge a quick touch up by realigning the edge, as shown by Cook's Illustrated. Technically, using this method means you're actually honing the knife, rather than sharpening it. For a dull blade, though, a knife sharpener provides the best method of obtaining a sharp edge again.
In addition, the most prized of the natural Japanese Water Stones are quarried in the Narutaki District north of Kyoto, Japan and are commonly available as either bench stones or pocket stones in grits ranging from 120 to 12,000. On the other hand, synthetic water stones are made from Aluminum Oxide and commonly available as either bench stones or pocket stones as well in grits ranging from 220 to 8,000 and, although this is the same abrasive material used to make India Oil Stones, the difference between the two is that the binder that holds the abrasive together enables Water Stones to be much softer than India Oil Stones which, in turn, promotes faster cutting because the worn abrasive material breaks away more quickly and is replaced with fresh, sharp, abrasive material more quickly. In addition, because water stones do not become glazed or loaded with swarf like oil stones can, new abrasive particles are constantly exposed as the stone wears so it continues to cut consistently. Plus, they can be lubricated effectively with water (rather than oil which can ruin some water stones) which combines with the fine particles of abrasive from the surface of the stone to form a slurry which polishes the bevel as the stone cuts. However, it should also be noted that Water Stones do become uneven significantly faster than other types of whetstones although, their softness does make them easier to true again.
Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.

Cost – While you can get a perfectly serviceable sharpening stick or stone sharpener for short money and some very high-quality tabletop manual 2 and 3-stage sharpeners for less than $50, high-quality mechanical systems will often run you $200 or even more. While that’s not so much money it’s likely to impact the quality of your life it is a lot to pay to keep a decent edge on your knives. While how much you ultimately pay for a sharpener is entirely up to you, you may want to consider your commitment to cooking and how often you are actually liable to use the device. If this is your first sharpener you might also want to consider learning how to sharpen a blade using a classic stick or stone sharpener first, before deciding if moving up to a mechanical sharpener is the right thing for you.
Certain knife sharpeners require you to spend up to 15 minutes of your life, just to get the edge or sharpness that you desire. If you are a busy individual, you may not have all that time in your life, and that is where the SunrisePro Knife Sharpener comes in. It makes the whole process of sharpening a knife easy and fast. It doesn’t matter how dull or damaged your blade is, this machine gets the job done within a few seconds.

From camping to fishing to hunting, this sharpener can come with you wherever you go and quickly clean up any wobbly, rusty, slightly dull blade in a snap. The rod itself retracts into the handle to not only make it take up less space, but also to protect the sharpener from bumps, scratches, and the external environment. Once collapsed, it is small enough to fit inside your pocket and even features a pocket clip for easy transportation.


To the good stuff. I spent hours on my large survival knife starting to bring it from a 30-40 degree angle down to about a 15 degree angle. And it worked. Although the labor was long, it was completely worth every penny. I was able to shave my arm hair with it and cut through paper okay. I would recommend also purchasing a 6000 grain whetstone as well if you want true razor sharp knives. However this will repair heavily used knives. I would not recommend this if your knife has a huge gash in it though. At that point it is better to buy a new knife.
Most people don't think about sharpening knives until this vital kitchen tool is no longer sharp. The truth is that nothing impacts the longevity of your knives, or their daily performance, more than regular sharpening and maintenance. A dull knife in the kitchen is more dangerous than a sharp one when employees must force their way through cutting meat and slicing vegetables. As a result, daily sharpening and maintenance is easy, and most importantly, necessary. We're here to show you how to use a sharpening stone, including correct techniques and maintenance. The end result is a more efficient, and safer, set of knives!
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