About a year ago, we wrote an article on why every man should carry a pocket knife. A lot of you out there agreed that the pocket knife deserves a permanent place in every man’s pocket. After we wrote the post, we started getting emails from men who were first time pocket knife owners asking how to sharpen their new prized possession. Well today we’re going to answer that question.
Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.

Our test targets consisted of 5 pounds of tomatoes and sheets of regular 8½-by-11-inch paper from a writing pad. (The “paper cut” test is a universal standard among sharpening enthusiasts.) After we tested each knife against both objects in its dull state, we sharpened it according to the manufacturer’s instructions on one of the seven sharpeners. We then repeated the tests and noted the relative improvements in cutting performance. We also paid attention to an issue that’s common to virtually all manual and electric sharpeners: their inability to sharpen all the way to the heel of the blade, the part closest to the handle. While stones and jigs can sharpen the entire length of a blade, most manual and electric sharpeners have a slotlike structure around the sharpening element that prevents the last quarter-inch (best case) to inch (worst) of the edge from reaching the sharpening element.
To take off the fine scratches and the burr left by coarser stones, and polish the surface, one can use stones starting around 2000 grain. Above that there is theoretically no upper limit, but at the same time stones above about #10000 provide no measurable practical improvement in the edge. It is also interesting to note that above #8000 grit, there is no Japanese measurement standard. With all the stones labelled as having a finer grit, one simply has to take the manufacturer’s word for it.
Do you have dull or blunt blades that are lying in the kitchen? If yes, then you can easily bring them back to life, with the Priority Chef Knife Sharpener. It doesn’t matter how long the knife has stayed without being used. This knife sharpener has all what it takes, to revive your knife and make it as sharp as new. You don’t need to spend money buying a new set of blades. With this device, you can recycle your dull, old and forgotten stockpile, and then sharpen them back to life.
Similar to electric sharpeners, manual sharpeners simplify the entire sharpening process. However, they tend to have fewer slots for sharpening. One benefit of manual or handheld sharpeners is their portability. Their manual operation, combined with their small size, makes it convenient for cooking professionals who are always on the move. Depending on how the manual sharpener is designed, you can either draw your knife between the slots or the sharpener is moved along the blade of the knife. Whichever type you choose, manual sharpeners easily sharpen a blunt or dull knife, to the desired level of sharpness.
If you’re looking for a simple knife sharpener that’s easy to use and can effectively sharpen knives without costing you an arm and a leg. Then consider getting the Wrenwane 2-stage knife sharpener which only cost around $12. It features 2 stage sharpening modes. Stage 1 is the Tungsten Carbide coarse blade to sharpen overly blunt knife. Stage 2 is the Ceramic fine rods for touching up after running to the coarse blade, or for fairly sharp knives that just need an extra little touch up.
Feedback is something that is very important to most sharpeners, i.e. how the stone feels when you are using it. Does it feel smooth, creamy and silky or does it feel hard and scratchy. While feedback, pleasant or unpleasant may be a purchase deterring factor it really doesn’t have any effect on level of sharpness that the stone can deliver. Unless of course the feedback is so distracting that it hinders the sharpeners focus and enjoyment and as a result, the sharpener doesn’t like what he/she is doing so that ultimately it does have the potential to negatively impact the results.
Its main disadvantage is cost: At about $120, the flagship stainless steel Professional model sits in an uncomfortable middle ground between our main pick and our upgrade pick. That said, an otherwise identical Classic model made of black plastic is generally closer to the price of our main pick. A lesser point, but an important one, is that this design is not completely foolproof, as our other picks are. You have to pay attention and use a steady hand and pressure to get a straight edge. Not hard—but you may need a little practice to master the process.
The SunrisePro Knife Sharpener is designed to make your cutting life easy. This USA-made and patented knife sharpener, features a striking red theme and an unusual design. It has an advanced grinding system, which allows you to sharpen different types of knives. This 100% original knife sharpener, also comes with a powerful suction cup. It is quick and easy to use. This SunrisePro Knife Sharpener review, tells you everything that you need to know about this product.
Technically, the name whetstone can be applied to any form of sharpening stone, regardless of what cutting fluid is typically used with it. However because whet sounds like wet, many hear the word and assume that it refers to a stone that is used wet with water. Actually, water stones, oil stones diamond stones and ceramic stones are all forms of whetstones. So, while all water stones are whetstones, not all whetstones are water stones.
For this type of hand held manual sharpener the 463 does an extraordinary job thanks mostly to the diamond abrasive wheels. You get an edge that’s both razor sharp and burr-free, as if you spent an hour working the edge on an oil stone. If people make a mistake with the 463 it’s that they assume more pressure is needed than actually is. Keep in mind though that it really shines on serrated and straight edged, double bevel Asian-style knives.
Does a great job of keeping a nice edge on kitchen knives and my fillet knives. Also works on serrated blades. The adjustable sharpening angles makes it a very versatile sharpener. Much easier to use than the kits with multiple stones and clamp system which holds the knife at the desired angle. This restores an edge and reaches adequate sharpness with just a few strokes of the knife through the carbide blades and then the ceramic rods. I found I got a much better edge with this sharpener in a fraction of the time it requires to mess with the stones and clamp of the sharpening "systems" and at a fraction of the cost. Unless the blade has been damaged, usually all that is required is a few passes through the ceramic rods at the desired angle to re establish a nice edge.
To use a whetstone you run the knife's blade back and forth across the stone's surface and due to the constant friction with the stone, which acts like a piece of sandpaper, the knife's edge becomes razor sharp and has a brilliant mirror shine. If you are a beginner at using a whetstone it can a take a while to master the sharpening process, so here is a video to help you with your sharpening stone skills.

Our favorite way to sharpen a blade is to use a whetstone—a rectangular block that works almost like sandpaper, helping to straighten and refine the cutting edge on the blade as you slide the knife across it. Most whetstones are designed to be soaked in water before every use, so check the manufacturer's instructions to be sure. (Fun fact: Whetstones aren't actually named for the fact that most are used wet—"whet" is actually just an old word for "sharpen").
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