We're not completely sure but we think we now have the largest selection of sharpening stones on the face of the earth. If you're interested in something and don't see it here please contact us and we'll try to get it. Most of the stones you see here are Japanese water stones, both synthetic and naturals. There is also a wide selection of stone holders, flatteners, and other items that will help you get a razor sharp edge on all your sharp tools and knives.
In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...
You can actually use these stones as finishing stones in their own right however and perhaps for Western knives which typically have a cutting edge similar to a ‘U’ rather than a ‘V’ shaped edge, a #5000 grit stone may well be as far as you need to go.but if you want to go for the #6000 or #8000 super fine stones then go for it! The only bit of advice you should follow is this: If you are using your knife to cut meat, then you can happily stop at #4000 or #6000 grit. If you are only using it for vegetables or fruit go all the way to the #8000. This is because the refinement you get from a # 8000 grit stone is such that your knife edge has the potential to bend whilst cutting through muscle and sinew.So that’s Whetstone grits explained. Hopefully that gives you everything you need to know. We have a selection of whetstones on our website, spanning the whole grit range. Stones require patience to learn and skill to use, but with a little practice you will get there and it will be well worth it.
Do you have dull or blunt blades that are lying in the kitchen? If yes, then you can easily bring them back to life, with the Priority Chef Knife Sharpener. It doesn’t matter how long the knife has stayed without being used. This knife sharpener has all what it takes, to revive your knife and make it as sharp as new. You don’t need to spend money buying a new set of blades. With this device, you can recycle your dull, old and forgotten stockpile, and then sharpen them back to life.

The manual Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener was the most distinctive tool in our test. Unlike the rest of the models we tried, it employs the V-notch system in which you “carve” a new edge on sharpened tungsten-carbide stones. As noted above, typically you can find such systems in cheap one-step sharpeners that have a deserved reputation for removing too much metal from blades and producing wavy edges that cut poorly and dull quickly. And going into our test, we were skeptical. However, thanks to clever and precise engineering, the Brød & Taylor model produced an excellent edge. It allowed us to hone and polish that edge simply by changing the angle of the blade, producing a sharp, even, stable, and durable edge that nearly matched that from our upgrade pick, the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV.

We used the honing rods on multiple knives, including our top pick for chef’s knives, the 8-inch Mac MTH-80—a hard Japanese blade—and a vintage 12-inch Wüsthof, a German knife with a softer blade. That covers the two main types of knives that people commonly own. To dull the knives between tests, we repeatedly sawed through 1-inch-thick hemp rope, a classic challenge used by knifemakers to demonstrate their blades’ durability. We focused on 12-inch rods, because a longer rod is easier to use—it offers more room to sweep the length of a standard 8- or 10-inch chef’s knife. 

There really is no point in having amazing knives if you don’t keep them sharp. Bert from TOG Knives has spent years experimenting with different sharpening methods and bits of equipment to work out the absolute best way to sharpen TOG Knives. If you follow the advice below we guarantee you will become a sharpening Ninja. Watch this space as we’ll be adding more videos in the future… 
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