The sharpener has come a long way in the past couple of thousand years and yet it hasn’t. That is, while there have been incredible advances in the development of mechanical knife sharpeners the classic and very ancient sharpening stone is still with us and very much in use as you read this. The best knife sharpener for you will be one that meets the needs of your cuisine and your temperament but which, first and foremost, reliably produces the sharp knives (look after your knife!) you need with the least hassle.


With 100 percent diamond abrasives and proprietary Trizor Edge technology, this knife sharpener has been engineered to give your knives an incredibly sharp and professional edge. Although it’s designed to professional standards, it’s easy for anyone to use, with magnetic guides that properly position the knife in the sharpening slots and help increase control of the sharpening process.
There really is no point in having amazing knives if you don’t keep them sharp. Bert from TOG Knives has spent years experimenting with different sharpening methods and bits of equipment to work out the absolute best way to sharpen TOG Knives. If you follow the advice below we guarantee you will become a sharpening Ninja. Watch this space as we’ll be adding more videos in the future…
If you do not remove enough metal to create a new edge, you will leave some of the dull edge in place. A dull blade (or a blade with dull spots or nicks) will reflect light from the very edge of the blade. A razor sharp knife edge will not show "bright spots" when you hold it blade up under a bright light. You will need to remove enough material from the sides of the bevel so that the edge stops reflecting light.

It's okay, but wish I purchased a different stone. The stone is too soft, therefore knife slowly cuts away the stone causing it to be unlevel. I am completely unable to keep it level, thus for me the stone became worthless. Feel the stone is cheaply made; I'd suggest buying a slightly more expensive whetstone. At end I had to trashed this stone and buy a new stone.

If you want to start hand-sharpening knives, and you’ve never used stones, this kit has everything you need. It includes a medium-grit stone for sharpening and an Arkansas stone for finishing. It also includes a honing solution that protects and cleans the stone’s surface as well as a small plastic guide to help sharpening novices learn the correct angle for sharpening. This is the classic method for sharpening knives, which takes some time to master, but once you learn how to use a stone, you can sharpen knives to any angle you prefer.
Mospro knife sharpener has great qualities, and it has received positive reviews from people who have tried it. It has a comfortable handle and a non-slip cushion on the bottom that keeps it secured when placed on a surface. The knife sharpener is very easy to use. It comes in a material that makes it very durable hence providing excellent service to the user. The two stage coarse and fine sharpening system does not disappoint the user.
From the look of it, one can easily tell that it is designed to deliver the user comfort when using it, safety and great results. The knife sharpener is made of quality ABS material that does not rust. The base is flattened, and it is non-slip in nature. The user enjoys two stage sharpening system from this product. This makes it easy to operate and also sharpen the knives. You can use it for steel straight blade kitchen knives.
The water stones work great for me. I spend about 10 minutes every other month with a 1000 grit and a 6000 grit to maintain it. I am very careful with my edge and I don't hack at beef bones with it and I always hand wash. It is truly something to experience when using a sharp knife. I have been a home cook for over 30 years. I used to think that the electric sharpener I have worked great, but now I know better.
The Whetstone 2-Sided Sharpening Stone is made from professional grade corundum and will sharpen everything from a razor blade to a cleaver and even a machete, should you happen to have a machete lying about that needs sharpening. This is the simplest type of sharpener it’s true but the company have obviously put a great deal of thought into the product.

I bought this knife sharpener for my son as a Christmas present years ago and recently (but cautiously) used it on my cutlery (Henkel and Wusthof). Frankly, I had been a little lazy and let my knifes lose a bit of their edge. I did not feel like getting out my stones and oil to do a proper job, so I borrowed my son's sharpener. It really works great, which I hate to admit, as it feels like a cheat and it is a fraction of what I spent on stones. I realize that I need to buy one for myself, so I looked around to see if there is anything better and I could not see anything that looked better. This one is adjustable, which is what I need. I looked at the 1 star ratings and there was a common theme that the knife edge chatters as the blade is pulled across. It can, if you don't use it properly! If your blade is very dull, you will need to pull with a very light, steady, and quick motion. You never need to push down hard as you pull. Even pressure. Don't be a brute! Finesse is what is needed. I am going to buy another one for me.


I'm a novice knife sharpener. I've had to unlearn what my grandpa taught me in order to use these. So far, I've had decent but mixed results. I've switched to my cheap 200/400-ish cheap tool stone from harbor freight for cutting a bevel when the blade has either been damaged or did not have a proper bevel. The 400/1000 grit stone in this kit is soft. Very soft. I have bowled it out several times. It makes keeping a steady angle difficult. But these stones at this price point are meant for learning, and for that they serve their purpose.
The final Chef’s Choice sharpener on our list is the 316 Diamond Sharpener. Like the 15XV the 316 is at its best when used to sharpen Asian-style knives and it does so with unflinching effectiveness and speed. This is a compact, 2-stage electric sharpener that produces the 15 degree edge so favored in Asian cutlery. Ideal for the preparation of sashimi or sushi.
The newly designed dual-sided combination whetstone from Fallkniven features a super fine white ceramic stone (0, 1 micron) with a grit of 1400 to 2000 and the dark grey ceramic stone is made of synthetic sapphires (1 micron) and has a grit of 800-1000. There is no need to add any oil or water, just lay the blade on the stone, raise the blade's spine and deburr your blade on the grey side until it has a razor-sharp edge and then use the smooth white side to get a nice polished edge.
This 9-inch honing steel is the perfect length for most people. Just slightly larger than the typical chef’s knife and slicing knife (usually the longest knives in a set), this rod will not be too much for most people to handle. Unlike the 12 and 14-inch rods featured further up this list, this 9-inch rod should be very easy to confidently and safely control.
A: For many years there was a heated debate around this topic with manufacturer’s stating flatly the notion their products actually damaged knives was absurd, and many professional chefs claiming not only was it not absurd, it was common for mechanical sharpeners to damage expensive cutlery. So who was right? To a certain extent they both were. The manufacturers were correct in asserting that if you followed the instructions to the letter there was little if any chance your knives would be damaged. However, in reality few people actually followed the instructions to the letter and when they veered from the recommended course the potential was there for damage.
This tiny, retractable rod has actually been designed for light sharpening and honing all in one step. Based on its size, I believe that this rod is best used by those who are uncomfortable flinging long knives and rods around as they attempt to put a finer edge on their blades. Its compact nature also makes it perfect for those who need to bring it with them on the go.
If you wish, further polish or even strop the edge to the desired sharpness. This makes the edge better suited for "push cutting" (cutting directly into materials, pushing straight down without sliding the blade across the object) but generally impairs slicing ability: without the "microscopic serrations" left by grinding with a stone, the blade tends to not bite into things like tomato skins.
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If you are a fan of matching your small appliances and gadgetry to your interior décor you will be quite pleased to hear that this sharpener is available in three different colors – black, lime green, and red. That being said, I don’t think it should be all that important, considering that this sharpener is so small it can easily be tossed in a drawer or backpack for safe keeping.
Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.
When a whetstone is used to cut metal, it acts like sandpaper by removing small particles of metal (aka “swarf”) with each pass of the blade over the stone. Therefore, whetstones with more coarse grits cut faster than those with finer grits and, at the same time, soft whetstones cut faster than hard whetstones because each pass of the blade over both types of whetstones not only removes fine particles of metal from the blade, it also removes fine particles from the surface of the whetstone (aka “slurry”) which continuously exposes new cutting crystals. However, if the swarf is allowed to build up on the surface of the whetstone during sharpening, it will clog the stone and drastically diminish its effectiveness. Therefore, some whetstones require water to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf whereas, other whetstones require oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf.
It takes time to sharpen a knife correctly. I spent about 30 minutes on an already fairly sharp knife. I then spent two more sessions of about 10 to 15 minutes each. I took it a bit further with a 6000 grit stone and this puts a nice polish on it. Instead of cutting through an onion, it glides or slips through it. It was truly shocking to me to use a really sharp knife. It may take a bit of time to get it right the first time, since this was my first time with a water stone, but it was well worth the effort. I have been trying to figure out the best way to get a really sharp knife.
Lubricate the stone. Some stones specifically use oil or water, and if that's the case, ensure you're using the recommended lubricant. Most importantly, whichever lubricant you choose, do not change it after the first use. When using oils, only use those approved for sharpening stones. Food oils such as vegetable and olive oil should never be applied! Some options like diamond stones, and others, don't need any lubricant at all, so be sure to check the stone's instructions.
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