After 15 hours of research and testing, and several adult lifetimes of kitchen experience, we recommend the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 as the best mechanical knife sharpener. It’s impressively simple—almost intuitive—to use: You run the blade back and forth between its diamond-impregnated sharpening wheels to cut and then hone a new edge. The ProntoPro 4643 works on both traditional European and Japanese knives, which use different edge angles, making it universally utilitarian. (Note that we also link to otherwise equivalent but cheaper single-angle sharpeners below.)
Once sufficiently wet, it's time to position the stone on something solid, so it doesn't move about during sharpening. Many come with holders, but you can just place it on a slightly damp tea towel on the table. The stone should be roughly perpendicular to your body, though Warner told me it is sometimes easier to angle it ever so slightly to the right (if you're right handed). 
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If you’re looking for a simple knife sharpener that’s easy to use and can effectively sharpen knives without costing you an arm and a leg. Then consider getting the Wrenwane 2-stage knife sharpener which only cost around $12. It features 2 stage sharpening modes. Stage 1 is the Tungsten Carbide coarse blade to sharpen overly blunt knife. Stage 2 is the Ceramic fine rods for touching up after running to the coarse blade, or for fairly sharp knives that just need an extra little touch up.

To take off the fine scratches and burrs left by coarser stones, and to polish the surface, you can use stones starting at around 2000 grit. There is theoretically no upper limit, but stones above about 10000 grit achieve practically no measurable improvement in the edge. It is also interesting to note that above 8000 grit, there is no Japanese measurement standard. For stones labelled as having a finer grit, you simply have to take the manufacturer's word for it.

After testing nine honing rods, both steel and ceramic, we think the Idahone 12″ fine ceramic rod is best for most kitchens. We were looking for a tool that kept knives of all styles sharp, from 4-inch paring knives to 12-inch chef’s knives. We wanted one that worked equally well on German and Japanese blades, which are made of softer and harder steels, respectively. We also wanted to pay less than $40. The Idahone met all our requirements. Its surface was noticeably smoother than that of the other three ceramic models we tried, yet rapidly restored the edges of all the knives we tested. It also removed less material from the blades, which will help to prolong their working lives. And compared with the five steel honing rods we tested, the Idahone was gentler on the blades.

Truly meant for honing, this rod features deep grooves which extend the length of the rod. As you sweep your blade along these grooves they will gently work to pull its edge back into proper alignment, making it stronger, straighter and allowing it to stay sharp for longer. Consumers appear to be very happy with this rod’s performance and construction. Their reviews give off an overwhelming impression that this rod is reliable and gets the job done right (so long as you know how to use a honing rod).


Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.
After sharpening properly with a medium grit stone, your knife will be very sharp! If you want an extra sharp razor edge, we recommend finishing with a higher grit stone. The sharpening process is the same, but the stone will remove much less steel, and form a less noticeable burr. Be sure to clean your knife and stone thoroughly after using to wash away all the steel you removed from the blade. Lastly, be sure to let your stones dry completely after use before storage.
I am just starting out sharpening with whet stones. I have found these stones to be very nice and the instructional videos that come along with the set on knifeplanet are extremely helpful to anyone starting out. The cost of the set was very reasonable and seems to be a great value. The customer service is amazing, I lost the site for the videos and sent an email to get the information and immediately there was a reply with all of the links that I needed. I appreciate their attention to their customers!!
A hybrid manual-electric sharpener, the Chef’sChoice Hybrid 210 uses a motor and abrasive wheels to grind the new edge and employs a manual stage to hone it. This sharpener is eminently affordable. However, our top pick, the ProntoPro 4643 multi-blade-angle manual model (as well as its $30 to $40 single-blade-angle kin) produces a better edge and doesn’t make us worry about breakdowns the way the Hybrid 210’s lightweight motor does.
The answer to the question of how to choose a single whetstone from among the many is actually one of both purpose and expense. Indeed, as the old adage says: “You get what you pay for” – This is certainly the case with sharpening stones. In fact, as a general rule, a high quality, natural, whetstone is significantly more expensive than a man-made whetstone but, they also tend to produce a noticeably finer edge than man-made stones do. On the other hand, man-made whetstones (with the exception of diamond hones) are very affordable and, just like natural whetstones, they too are available in different grits for different stages in the sharpening process from cutting the initial edge bevel to polishing a finely honed edge.

The truth is that there is no one recommendation that we can make that will meet everyone’s needs. Every sharpener’s needs are different and every sharpening toolkit will be different. In order to help beginning sharpeners get started with good sharpening stones to build around, we need to understand their individual needs. So with that in mind, let’s look at the basic needs of a beginning sharpener.
This sleek 3 slot knife sharpener has unsurpassed technology that allows the user to sharpen a knife to the original factory angle. It's easy to adjust the sharpening angle by simply pushing down and turning the knob, adjusting both the coarse and fine sharpening slots. If the angle of an Asian knife is unknown, use the recommended 16° marked clearly on the knob or select an angle within the red area. If the angle of Euro/American knife is unknown, use the recommended 20° marked on the knob or select an angle within the gray area. The fine sharpening slot features ceramic stones for finishing the knife edge and every day light honing and maintenance of an already sharp knife. The coarse sharpening slot features diamond stones that are used to sharpen dull or damaged knives. The serrated slot is a fixed angle slot. It does not adjust. It includes ceramic stones that are specifically designed to sharpen most styles of serrated knives.
Be aware that few sharpeners of any type can properly sharpen serrated knives; that’s a job best left to a professional, so we didn’t knock points off our test models if they lacked the capability. Luckily, serrated knives tend to stay sharp for years and years, since it’s the teeth (rather than the edge) that do most of the work. For this review we focused on the sort of knives that sharpeners are designed for: those with standard, straight-edged blades, such as paring and chef’s knives.
"Sharpening is like a hangover cure," says Laurie Timpson, founder of Savernake Knives in Wiltshire. "If there was a cure and you knew about it, I'd stay at your house, crash on your sofa and have whatever it was when I woke up. Everyone would have it and there'd be no discussion. Everybody says they've created a perfect sharpening technique, and they haven't." 
If you’re looking for a simple knife sharpener that’s easy to use and can effectively sharpen knives without costing you an arm and a leg. Then consider getting the Wrenwane 2-stage knife sharpener which only cost around $12. It features 2 stage sharpening modes. Stage 1 is the Tungsten Carbide coarse blade to sharpen overly blunt knife. Stage 2 is the Ceramic fine rods for touching up after running to the coarse blade, or for fairly sharp knives that just need an extra little touch up.
I recommend keeping two stones in your kit. One with a medium grit (around 800 or so) to perform major sharpening jobs, and one with a fine grit (at least 2,000) to tune the edge to a razor-sharp finish. For real pros, a stone with an ultra-fine grit (8,000 and above) will leave a mirror-like finish on your blade, but most cooks won't notice the difference in terms of cutting ability.

There are consumers that used the Chosera stones for years with amazing results. Some even bought the different lines of Chosera stones since it can be hard to choose a favorite (just like the Naniwa Chosera 800 Grit Stone which is also highly recommended) and all serves different sharpening purposes. But many agreed that the Chosera 1,000-Grit is an excellent stone to create a new bevel on straight edge razors.
As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.

using an appropriate blade for the task – a thinner blade for more delicate work, and a thicker blade whenever a thinner blade is not required (e.g. a thinner blade might be used to cut fillets, butterfly steak or roast for stuffing, or perform Mukimono, while a thicker one might be used to slice or chop repeatedly, separate primal cuts of poultry or small game, or scrape and trim fat from meat or hide, as these actions would be more likely to cause unnecessary wear on a thinner blade.)


Looking for the best manual knife sharpener that’s easy to use and effective? Then consider getting the Brod & Taylor Professional which is a home foolproof knife sharpener that has a unique design to effectively sharpen smooth and serrated knives. Consumers find it very easy to use, sharpens all types of knives, sturdy that’s built to last, and quite attractive to sit on the counter.
Everyone who owns a knife needs a sharpener. Even the highest-quality knife will lose its edge over time and with use. The metal wears away on the cutting board, it chips on animal bones and bends on tough root vegetables, and it dissolves in the acids and salts of the kitchen. A dull knife is a dangerous knife. To keep it safe, and to keep a knife working, you need to sharpen it regularly. 

Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for both #2 and carpenter pencils. Just use with your current bit on the fly. Manual or power-driven design evenly sharpens. Integrated shaving reservoir with see-through window. Features high carbon steel blades and a lifetime warranty.  More + Product Details Close
I really like this stone. The 1000/4000 grit combination is perfect for my needs. I'm a woodturner, and belong to a club that brings in professional turners from around the world. One had an eye opening test of sharpness. He stacked around 25 new razor blades in a box with one open side. The box assured that the blades were in perfect alignment. If you looked at the blades' sharp ends head on, all you saw was black. His point was that if you can see the edge, the blade is not sharp. Any reflection from the edge, again, facing it head on, is a dull spot. My long story leads to the fact that I was able to sharpen several knives to the point of not seeing the edge. This is not the stone to use if you are trying to remove nicks from a blade. A lower grit will do that job. This is for putting a fine, "invisible" edge on the blade, and with the right technique, that's what it will do. Another thing to consider is the fact that these stones are "sacrificial" A stone wears because it is deliberately giving up dull surface particles to expose the sharp ones below them. Anyone expecting a stone to last forever is mistaken. Bottom line? I think this is a great stone that takes my knives to the level of sharpness I need in both woodworking and cooking. I also like the rubber frame it sits in, giving you much better control over the stone. Your efforts can go into sharpening without having to steady the stone on your workbench or countertop.
If you don't want to learn the skill of sharpening on a stone, a pull through sharpener may be a good option. The pull through sharpener consists of one or more smalle grinding wheels with a fine or coarse grit. In order to sharpen the knife you pull the knife several times through the grinding wheels without really pushing. The results of this shaprening method are of lower quality than sharpening rods and stones. The result is a relatively jagged edge, and the sharpness is of short duration. To get really sharp knives, it is therefore advisable to use one or more sharpening stones. The fast and somewhat rough treatment of a pull through sharpener is, in particular for harder steels, not recommended. A good knife actually deserves a more sophisticated sharpening method, such as sharpening on a stone.

The M3 uses a tapered diamond sharpening rod to effectively restore the cutting performance of your entire knife set. Swap out the diamond sharpening rod for the ceramic honing rod and you can easily put a razor-sharp finish on your knives. The handle incorporates a 17° angle that sets the knife in the proper position for consistent passes along the rods – the key to achieving a sharp edge along the entire length of the blade. It’s that simple – you’re ready to start enjoying your culinary experience with sharp, precise cutlery that’s a joy to use.

Vielsalm Coticule on the other hand generally occurs in much more narrow layers sandwiched between the slate layer and the Belgian Blue layer and thus, it is both less plentiful and more expensive than Belgian Blue stone. Also, Coticule is divided into different grades and sometimes displays blemishes on the surface due to its proximity to the slate layer. Furthermore, it is somewhat harder than Belgium Blue stone and, due to its brittleness, it is bonded to a substrate layer of hard slate prior to sale to prevent the stone from breaking during use.


On the other hand, the surfaces of knives that have been looked after may blacken a little, but this is a different type of iron oxide than ordinary reddish rust. This black oxidation is mainly triiron tetraoxide (Fe3O4). It coats the surface of the metal and prevents ordinary rust from getting in. It will not discolor food and poses no threat to hygiene.
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