Method 3: Use a Sharpening Stone. This is the best method by far. Not only will it give you the best edge, it also removes the least amount of material. With a fine enough grit, your knife should be able to take hairs off your arm when you've finished. Additionally—and I'm not kidding about the importance of this one—the act of sharpening your knife will help you create a much stronger bond with your blade, and a knife that is treated respectfully will behave much better for its owner. The only problem? It takes a little know-how.
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The Trizor XV employs a three-stage sharpening and honing process using diamond-impregnated cutting wheels. The first time you sharpen a blade, you use the coarsest setting first to establish a completely new bevel. The fine wheels then form a secondary bevel, and finally the honing wheels polish the secondary bevel. The result is an arch-shaped edge that Chef’sChoice claims is more durable than a standard triangular edge. Thereafter, use of the honing wheels and an occasional pass on the fine wheels will keep the edge sharp for months or years before you need to cut an entirely new edge with the coarse wheels.

If you follow Joe’s instructions and still can’t get a good edge, chances are your knives have been abused to the point that they need a pro’s touch to restore the edge. You can do it yourself, but it takes expensive electric tools or a lot of tricky manual grinding on a stone. But for well under $10 per knife, a sharpening shop can bring your edges to better-than-new condition. Then you’ll be able to keep them that way using Joe’s techniques. Search online for “knife sharpening” followed by your city and you’ll surely find a local sharpener. And don’t give up on high-quality knives that have a chip or notch in the blade. A pro can grind out any imperfections and reshape the edge. Yes, you’ll have a slightly narrower blade, but you won’t even notice.
This knife sharpening system comes with a firm grip, to ensure a fine finish. This device does not slip around when sharpening your knife. You just need to hold it firm and it will adhere to the surface. This ensures that you get the desired results. The carbide surface is optimized to handle any type of knife. It doesn’t matter how blunt or damaged it is, it will give you a fine edge, for precision cutting.
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Honing steels are another story altogether. Honing steels are those instruments that look light a saber (light or otherwise) which you use to gussy up the edge of the blade periodically before using it. These do wear out every few years or less, depending on how often you use them. If you are unsure whether your honing steel is worn out run your finger around it. If it feels smooth all the way around then it’s time for a replacement. Not to worry though, they’re really affordable. One thing you may want to keep in mind about honing steels is that they typically won’t do much to hone the edge of some super hard knives, such as Japanese Global brand knives.
Although the Trizor XV is easy to use, you have to use it correctly. That means sharpening one side of the blade at a time until a burr forms, whereas a back-and-forth, one-side-and-then-the-other approach might seem more intuitive. (Don’t worry—the Trizor XV’s manual explains the process plainly.) Maintenance is easy: Once a year or so, you open the bin on the machine’s underside and wipe out the metal shavings that it has conveniently captured there with a magnet.
Although the Trizor XV is easy to use, you have to use it correctly. That means sharpening one side of the blade at a time until a burr forms, whereas a back-and-forth, one-side-and-then-the-other approach might seem more intuitive. (Don’t worry—the Trizor XV’s manual explains the process plainly.) Maintenance is easy: Once a year or so, you open the bin on the machine’s underside and wipe out the metal shavings that it has conveniently captured there with a magnet.

It’s up to you if you want to use a sharpening steel or a handheld knife sharpener for honing your knives. The handheld is really easy to use. For fast, effective sharpening, simply place the blade in the slot and gently pull it through a few times. If you want to use a sharpening steel, just make sure it has a higher hardness factor than the knife to be sharpened. One more important thing: don’t ever hone serrated knives. They must be sharpened by a professional or replaced. Period.


Put the pointed, narrow end of the sharpener up against the open end of the gut hook. The narrow, pointed end of the sharpener should face in toward the thickness of the blade, away from the edge of the gut hook. Match the angle of the sharpener to the original edge angle. This will maintain the correct sharpening angle and prevent you from getting cut by the blade tip. Hold the same angle when sharpening each side of the gut hook.
The Sharpening and Specialty lines of waterstones from Naniwa are available in several packages of three to five stones. The Specialty line is the same as the Sharpening line, but half the thickness and therefore less expensive. Both the Sharpening and the Specialty stones are 8 1/4" long by 2 3/4" wide, amply sized for most knives and tools. These are a higher grade stone that do not require soaking before use. While you would need a flattening stone in addition, these kits are a good way to enter into premium grade waterstones.
Both Belgian Blue and Vielsalm Coticule are ancient stone layers found in the Belgian Ardenne Mountains with characteristics similar to both Novaculite and Siliciclastic sedimentary stone in that it is a metamorphic stone consisting of both gray and yellow volcanic ash mixed with tiny Spessartite Garnet crystals suspended in a clay matrix. However, due to its geology, both types of stone occur only in vertical seams sandwiched between two thick layers of bluish-purple slate and thus, they must be meticulously extracted mostly by hand. However, this type of extraction process is both very time-consuming and very labor-intensive and, quarrymen can only extract the stone for a few months each year due to inclement weather conditions. Consequently, both Belgium Blue and Coticule whetstones tend to be somewhat expensive.
The blades of Sugimoto Hamono Japanese knives are tempered using the traditional mizu-yaki process which gives the metal a harder finish compared with Western knives. As a result, if you sharpen the cutting blade so that it becomes too thin, it will not be able to maintain its mechanical strength and may chip. In addition, you need to use a flat-surface whetstone to back-grind a Japanese knife. Be careful not to over-grind the blade. Blades made using the hon-kasumi method consist of two different layers of metal that are forge-welded together. Since the blade is composed of two layers, it may slightly bend over time, but this can be corrected at our Company. Single-beveled-blade knives cut with the back side of their blade. Please take particular care that this back side does not become rusty.
Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.
The Whetstone 2-Sided Sharpening Stone is made from professional grade corundum and will sharpen everything from a razor blade to a cleaver and even a machete, should you happen to have a machete lying about that needs sharpening. This is the simplest type of sharpener it’s true but the company have obviously put a great deal of thought into the product.

The kind of tech we love: compact, reliable, durable, attractive and cheap. Purists may feel that other sharpeners will produce a more perfect result but for 99% of the human race this sharpener will be everything the doctor ordered. Your blades stay sharp for a good long time thanks to the 2-stage sharpening process and if you’re a left handed chef you’ll love the fact that it works just as effectively for you as for anyone else.
The Presto EverSharp 08800 electric knife sharpener gets great reviews. In our test, though, its flimsy motor instantly bogged down when our knife contacted its sharpening wheels—and even light pressure threatened to stop the the sharpening wheels entirely. The high, wide guide frames meant it couldn’t sharpen the last ¾ inch of a blade, an unacceptable shortcoming. We’ll take our experience over the reviews.
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