One of the only things we don’t like about the Idahone is the lack of a prominent finger guard where the rod meets the handle. As a result, we highly recommend using the safer “supported” technique for honing a knife, as demonstrated in our guide to chef’s knives. In this method, the rod is held against the counter or cutting board, and blade always moves away from your body and grip-hand, greatly reducing the chance of a nasty accident.
If you have invested your hard-earned money in a quality set of kitchen knives it is important that you care for them properly. Of course, you could always send them away for sharpening, but why pay money to have someone else do what you could easily do yourself? Not to mention the inconvenience of having to drive them to and from the sharpener or pay shipping and handling to send them by mail.

A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.


Very quickly, we gravitated toward the ceramic rods, which all performed well on both types of blade; the steel honing rods created tiny chips on the Japanese blades. That’s because steel honing rods are made of exceptionally hard metal covered with fine ridges. These ridges bend softer German knife edges back into alignment, but harder Japanese knife edges have a tendency to break rather than bend. The ceramic rods also provided a very slight stickiness or friction when honing that made it easier to sweep the blades in smooth strokes, as you’re supposed to. Steel hones feel slick—the blade wants to slip instead of glide—and that makes them a bit trickier to master. And for the reasons above, the Idahone rapidly became our favorite among the ceramic rods. We’re also not alone in liking it: It’s extremely well-reviewed on Amazon and is recommended by many specialist knife retailers, including Chef Knives To Go, Epicurean Edge, and Knife Merchant.
You shouldn’t use this stone often, as it will wear your knife down. The #2000 and #3000 grit stones can be used more often if you are the sort of person who likes to sharpen a bit more regularly as they are less coarse, but again, they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining your edge.Once you get into a routine, you will get to know how often you need to use your medium stone.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.
On the other hand, the surfaces of knives that have been looked after may blacken a little, but this is a different type of iron oxide than ordinary reddish rust. This black oxidation is mainly triiron tetraoxide (Fe3O4). It coats the surface of the metal and prevents ordinary rust from getting in. It will not discolor food and poses no threat to hygiene.
The M3 uses a tapered diamond sharpening rod to effectively restore the cutting performance of your entire knife set. Swap out the diamond sharpening rod for the ceramic honing rod and you can easily put a razor-sharp finish on your knives. The handle incorporates a 17° angle that sets the knife in the proper position for consistent passes along the rods – the key to achieving a sharp edge along the entire length of the blade. It’s that simple – you’re ready to start enjoying your culinary experience with sharp, precise cutlery that’s a joy to use.

Looking at the performance, it is hard to find a sharpening stone on the market that performs better than this one. This one is simply irreplaceable. Furthermore, using this stone is a straightforward process. You just sprinkle some water on the surface and then push and pull your blade across. After a few strokes, your knife is sharp and ready. In addition, it doesn’t require too much water consumption. You don’t have to stop every now and then to sprinkle water.
The first slot contains carbide blades which effortless shave your blade as you draw it through. The blades feature microscopic carbide particles which help them rough up the edges of the blade as it moves through to get an even deeper shave. The second sharpening slot contains two ceramic rods which work to hone your blade as you draw it through. They gently pull your blade into alignment and buff away the rough edge etched into it in the first stage. You can even choose to skip the first stage and use only the ceramic rods to hone your knife on a regular basis.
To use Al's method, take a black felt pen and shade in the bevel of the knife. Then take two strokes on the stone and examine the edge. If you have maintained the proper angle then all the black will be gone. If you see black on the top of the edge it means you are holding the back of the knife too far from the stone. If there is black on the bottom of the edge but the top is clean then you are laying the knife too flat on the stone and you need to raise it a bit. Repaint the edge and try it again. Once you discover what the right angle looks like then just maintain that.

The most important aspect of a sharpening stone is the grit. If you have knives that have taken a beating and are either nicked up or really dull, you’ll need a courser stone to get it back into shape. And in order to put an exceptionally sharp edge on an already sharp knife, you’ll need a finer grit stone. If your knives are already in pretty good shape and just need a touch up, buying just a finer grit stone might be enough, but don’t think you can get away without a courser stone for knives that need more TLC. It is possible to buy a combination, or two-sided sharpening stone.
The type and size of the blade being sharpened determines the size of the stone needed. In general , a 6" stone is considered a small sharpening stone, an 8" stone is a common larger size, and a stone larger than 8" (10"-12" are available) is considered generously sized. Stones smaller than 6" (3" and 4" stones are quite common), are considered pocket stones and can be used for toolboxes, tackle boxes and on-the-go sharpening, but are generally not recommended for regular sharpening jobs.
If you’re sharpening high quality knives, you probably don’t want to use a cheapo sharpening stone. But if you’re just getting started with sharpening your pocket knife, there’s no need to get too fancy right off the bat. You can find a sharpening stone at most hardware stores for about $10. This one is very similar to the one I use. Nothing fancy. Most basic sharpening stones come with two sides: a rough grit and a fine grit. The finer the grit, the finer or sharper you can get your blade. You usually start off sharpening on the rough grit and then finish sharpening it on the finer grit.
It does its job in two stages, one for sharpening and the other one for honing. This delivers sharper knives that stay sharp for a long time. The diamond abrasive guarantee the user faster manual sharpening. The knife sharpener is compact in its design thus easy to store. It comes at a very economical price making it the go-to product on the market. It can work on your kitchen knives, pocket knives, and even santoku.
Looking for the best manual knife sharpener that’s easy to use and effective? Then consider getting the Brod & Taylor Professional which is a home foolproof knife sharpener that has a unique design to effectively sharpen smooth and serrated knives. Consumers find it very easy to use, sharpens all types of knives, sturdy that’s built to last, and quite attractive to sit on the counter.
Cerax and Suehiro stones from Suehiro are a little harder, and as such do not wear down as quickly as the classic Japanese water stones. The 8000 grit stone will perhaps give you the best cutting edge with a mirror polish on chisels and similar blades. Suehiro also makes a small combination stone for those who do not sharpen tools all that often and are reluctant to spend extra for a Cerax stone.
TO USE: Soak stone in water for no more than 5-10 minutes. Place stone on a damp cloth with the courser 400 grit side (dark green) facing up. Hold the knife so that it’s flat and perpendicular to the block, with the blade facing left. Holding the knife at a 20-degree angle, slowly sweep the edge of the blade from left to right down the length of the stone and continue until sharp. If stone starts to feel too dry, add more water. Be patient and take your time. Flip knife over and repeat on the other side (now moving from right to left). Be sure to sharpen both sides evenly. To polish the blade further, flip stone over to the fine 1000 grit side (light green) and repeat the process. When blade is honed to desired sharpness, wash and dry your knife. To clean your stone, simply rinse with water, wipe away any remaining metal residue with a rag, rinse again, then dry.
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