Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...

Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for both #2 and carpenter pencils. Just use with your current bit on the fly. Manual or power-driven design evenly sharpens. Integrated shaving reservoir with see-through window. Features high carbon steel blades and a lifetime warranty.  More + Product Details Close
If you want a quality sharpening tool, this is the product to go for. This is why we have rated it as number one due to the incredible service that it will offer you, comes with an ergonomic design that gives the user a secure and comfortable grip. It sharpens knives very fast and more efficiently. It has two stages of sharpening thus providing a chance to sharpen thick steel blades and the softer steel blades.
It's okay, but wish I purchased a different stone. The stone is too soft, therefore knife slowly cuts away the stone causing it to be unlevel. I am completely unable to keep it level, thus for me the stone became worthless. Feel the stone is cheaply made; I'd suggest buying a slightly more expensive whetstone. At end I had to trashed this stone and buy a new stone.

A hybrid manual-electric sharpener, the Chef’sChoice Hybrid 210 uses a motor and abrasive wheels to grind the new edge and employs a manual stage to hone it. This sharpener is eminently affordable. However, our top pick, the ProntoPro 4643 multi-blade-angle manual model (as well as its $30 to $40 single-blade-angle kin) produces a better edge and doesn’t make us worry about breakdowns the way the Hybrid 210’s lightweight motor does.


Grip the handle of the knife firmly with one hand, and with your opposite hand spread your fingers across the the blade in a way that enables you to apply even pressure. Maintaining a consistent angle, and applying even pressure, drag your knife across the stone with slow, deliberate passes. Over time, you will see a build up of dark sludge called a slurry. This is good! It will help remove metal from your knife and make the edge sharp. Once you finish running the blade along one side you should be able to feel a small hook or ‘burr’ along the other. After you successfully form a burr, turn the knife over and start again on the other side.
One of the only things we don’t like about the Idahone is the lack of a prominent finger guard where the rod meets the handle. As a result, we highly recommend using the safer “supported” technique for honing a knife, as demonstrated in our guide to chef’s knives. In this method, the rod is held against the counter or cutting board, and blade always moves away from your body and grip-hand, greatly reducing the chance of a nasty accident.
Mospro knife sharpener has great qualities, and it has received positive reviews from people who have tried it. It has a comfortable handle and a non-slip cushion on the bottom that keeps it secured when placed on a surface. The knife sharpener is very easy to use. It comes in a material that makes it very durable hence providing excellent service to the user. The two stage coarse and fine sharpening system does not disappoint the user.
Looking for the best manual knife sharpener that’s easy to use and effective? Then consider getting the Brod & Taylor Professional which is a home foolproof knife sharpener that has a unique design to effectively sharpen smooth and serrated knives. Consumers find it very easy to use, sharpens all types of knives, sturdy that’s built to last, and quite attractive to sit on the counter.

Our test of the Brød & Taylor turned a dull blade into one that effortlessly and cleanly sliced both tomatoes and paper. Due to the reputation of V-notch carbide sharpeners, however, I was concerned about the durability of the edge, so I did an additional test: I used the Brød & Taylor to sharpen my old pocketknife, which uses 440C steel, one of the earliest knife-worthy stainless alloys and one that more refined alloys have since surpassed. I then made 50 slices through a cardboard box, rehoned and repolished the knife (but did not resharpen it), and made 50 more slices. After all that, I was still able to slice a tomato and peel an apple without problem. That’s impressive: Cardboard is so tough on blade edges that knifesmiths use it as a kind of stress test.
Guided sharpening systems use a holder where you secure your knife, one or several sharpening sticks or conductors. Through the use of the holder, it is easy to select the right angle for sharpening. When using a guided sharpening system, there are two ways to sharpen your knife: a. Sharpening sticks are placed in the holder, after which you pull the knife along the different sharpening sticks, in order to sharpen it. b. The knife is secured in the holder, after which you pull the sharpening sticks along the blade. There are various systems for sale with a sharpening stone grinding the knife under a adjustable angle. The advantage is that you have a nice straight cutting edge. Disadvantage of this method is that it takes more time than grinding on a regular sharpening stone. Moreover, by sharpening with a fixed angle, you are much less flexible. So if you don't want to sharpen the knife in ze pre-fixed angle, you will still have to do it manually. The guided sharpening systems are highly recommendable for sharpening expensive pocket knives, because they provide a very nice cutting edge. By pasting the blade with adhesive tape, you can prevent any scratches caused by the clamping system. For kitchen knives, it is advisable to use a sharpening stone or electric grinder.

Different knives are sharpened differently according to grind (edge geometry) and application. For example, surgical scalpels are extremely sharp but fragile, and are generally disposed of, rather than sharpened, after use. Straight razors used for shaving must cut with minimal pressure, and thus must be very sharp with a small angle and often a hollow grind. Typically these are stropped daily or more often. Kitchen knives are less sharp, and generally cut by slicing rather than just pressing, and are steeled daily. At the other extreme, an axe for chopping wood will be less sharp still, and is primarily used to split wood by chopping, not by slicing, and may be reground but will not be sharpened daily. In general, but not always, the harder the material to be cut, the higher (duller) the angle of the edge.
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 
As noted previously, this automatic knife sharpener uses precision angle sharpening guides, which makes sure you obtain the proper angle with every use. It comes with two guides, which are the 50° guide and the 40° guide. The 40° guide is mainly used for thinner blades as well as kitchen knives. On the other hand, the 50° guide is used for outdoor and hunting knives.
The goal when sharpening is to create a burr, which is a tiny whisper of metal left on one side of the blade. You'll know you have a burr when you can feel one smooth and one scratchy side to the edge. Warner's is formed in no time at all; I struggled. Nevertheless, eventually I got there. Once you've got the burr, it's time to move on to step three.
So, as you can see, there are numerous different types and grades of whetstones on the market today and each has its advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, the right practice to choose the right sharpening stone for you is to choose a whetstone material based upon how fast you need to remove metal and how fine an edge you need. For instance, although they are often the most expensive type of whetstone, diamond hones generally cut the fastest even in their finer grits followed by Crystolon Stones and then India Stones which are then generally followed by Japanese Water Stones and then by Novaculite, Belgian Blue, and Coticule whetstones in terms of how fast they remove metal. However, it should also be noted that the rougher an edge is, the less sharp it is while, the more polished an edge is, the sharper it is and thus, rough edges are fine for some tools while other tools require a much finer edge and, hunting knives require the finest edge of all. Therefore, the trick to choosing the proper whetstone for any given sharpening purpose is to purchase multiple stones with varying grits to accomplish each given task from cutting an initial bevel or defining a damaged edge to refining an existing edge to polishing it. We hope this article helped you. Feel free to leave a comment below if you have questions.
Grit choices should fall in line with the steel used to make the knives you plan to sharpen. If your knives are all European, relatively soft steel knives, then you could finish off your knives at the 1,000 – 2,000 grit level. There is a lengthy explanation regarding this topic but suffice it to say that at 2,000 grit, these knives can be made extremely sharp.
Looking at the performance, it is hard to find a sharpening stone on the market that performs better than this one. This one is simply irreplaceable. Furthermore, using this stone is a straightforward process. You just sprinkle some water on the surface and then push and pull your blade across. After a few strokes, your knife is sharp and ready. In addition, it doesn’t require too much water consumption. You don’t have to stop every now and then to sprinkle water.
Put the pointed, narrow end of the sharpener up against the open end of the gut hook. The narrow, pointed end of the sharpener should face in toward the thickness of the blade, away from the edge of the gut hook. Match the angle of the sharpener to the original edge angle. This will maintain the correct sharpening angle and prevent you from getting cut by the blade tip. Hold the same angle when sharpening each side of the gut hook.
The most advanced hybrid yet with acclaimed Criss-Cross The most advanced hybrid yet with acclaimed Criss-Cross sharpening technology. Electric and manual sharpening stages that provide superior edge geometry and razor sharp edges on both straight edge and serrated knives including household and kitchen knives sports knives and pocket knives. The diamond abrasive wheels sharpen simultaneously "into" and "out-of" ...  More + Product Details Close
The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.
The company is to be commended for including links to instructional videos in the package. Those videos lay out clearly how to get the most from your Whetstone sharpener stone. Once you get up to speed you’ll likely enjoy the process and at the same time achieve professional quality results time and again. Sure, it’s not fancy and doesn’t have a sleek, chrome plated design but it works.
A major benefit of sharpening your knives on a sharpening stone is that you can thin out your knife. When thinning out a knife, you grind away extra material on the sides of the blade, making the blade thinner. Thinning of a knife is useful for knives that are often sharpened, as the cutting edge gets fatter when the blade is sharpened more often. Thinning is of great importance for the preservation of good cutting properties.
Soaked stone for about 20 minutes, then when attempting to sharpen the blade, A red slurry ends up all over the blade. Even a couple sprays from a water bottle and a wipe with a microfiber appears to take material off the surface. Since it is not coming off evenly across the stone surface, it is now uneven and the stone appears to be unusable at this point.

If the blade is only slightly dull, using a steel rod, called knife sharpening steel, can give the edge a quick touch up by realigning the edge, as shown by Cook's Illustrated. Technically, using this method means you're actually honing the knife, rather than sharpening it. For a dull blade, though, a knife sharpener provides the best method of obtaining a sharp edge again.
The Juuma sharpening and honing stones offer a simplified working principle while at the same time ensuring the highest possible quality in the offered grits. Juuma Cobalt Blue stones are made of an aluminium oxide and a bonding agent. Adding cobalt serves to slow stone abrasion and increase the speed of sharpening. The speed bonus is especially marked when stoning blue steel (blue paper steel that is often used for Japanese planes and chisels). The cobalt gives the stones their blue colour. Juuma is our proprietary brand. Juuma sharpening stones are produced by a renowned Japanese whetstone manufacturer.
Our test targets consisted of 5 pounds of tomatoes and sheets of regular 8½-by-11-inch paper from a writing pad. (The “paper cut” test is a universal standard among sharpening enthusiasts.) After we tested each knife against both objects in its dull state, we sharpened it according to the manufacturer’s instructions on one of the seven sharpeners. We then repeated the tests and noted the relative improvements in cutting performance. We also paid attention to an issue that’s common to virtually all manual and electric sharpeners: their inability to sharpen all the way to the heel of the blade, the part closest to the handle. While stones and jigs can sharpen the entire length of a blade, most manual and electric sharpeners have a slotlike structure around the sharpening element that prevents the last quarter-inch (best case) to inch (worst) of the edge from reaching the sharpening element.
The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.

Jigs, such as the industry-standard Edge Pro, are an extension of the stone method, as they use simple but cleverly designed armatures to maintain a consistent angle between the stone and the blade. They’re extremely effective—professional knife sharpeners are some of their biggest champions—but they’re also expensive, and really practical only with a dedicated workbench.
As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.

Our favorite way to sharpen a blade is to use a whetstone—a rectangular block that works almost like sandpaper, helping to straighten and refine the cutting edge on the blade as you slide the knife across it. Most whetstones are designed to be soaked in water before every use, so check the manufacturer's instructions to be sure. (Fun fact: Whetstones aren't actually named for the fact that most are used wet—"whet" is actually just an old word for "sharpen").
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