While I do not necessarily believe the next four electric sharpeners are quite as good as the one I placed in our Top Three Choices of knife sharpeners, I must say that they are rather impressive. All of the sharpeners on this list have received rave reviews from actual consumers, so all are worth your time. Also, the selection for the Top Three was partially based on my opinion and you may have an entirely different one after you see these four impressive machines.
As you probably have guessed, knives are easier to sharpen on longer stones. The width of the stone is less important than the length when sharpening knives. The longer stone allows for longer sharpening strokes and contributes to faster sharpening. The longer strokes mean fewer strokes across your stone, making it easier to maintain a consistent sharpening angle. As a rule of thumb, a small knife can easily be sharpened on a large stone, but a large knife cannot easily be sharpened on a small stone.
While I do not necessarily believe the next four electric sharpeners are quite as good as the one I placed in our Top Three Choices of knife sharpeners, I must say that they are rather impressive. All of the sharpeners on this list have received rave reviews from actual consumers, so all are worth your time. Also, the selection for the Top Three was partially based on my opinion and you may have an entirely different one after you see these four impressive machines.
Your stroke can be straight or circular, from "hilt to tip" OR "tip to hilt," whichever is more comfortable. If you're using a small portable sharpener, stroke the blade in nearly a straight direction. Remember to always cut into the stone and never pull or drag your edge backwards. The blade edge should face in the same direction as your stroke. So, you're essentially moving the metal away from the edge. We recommend the circular stroke as it helps you maintain your angle instead of having to find it every time you lift the knife from the stone.
An extremely well written and informative article on sharpening. Overtime we all get to love certain stones for our sharpening needs. I am a huge coticule fan, and although i have used all the others, i always come back to this natural stone above all others. Still trying to figure if i chose it or it chose me! NEver the less there are so many options out there it is not hard with a little time and effort to find the right combination for your needs.
Once you’ve decided that an electric knife sharpener is for you, it comes down to finding the right one. Unfortunately, there isn’t just one sharpener that is right for everyone. For that reason, we’ve put together a chart to help you choose between the top knife sharpeners for 2017. In this table, the knife type “standard” refers to a standard straight-edge, 20-degree American/European blade. All sizes are in inches.
Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil!
✅ PREMIUM QUALITY : Our products have been inspected by a reputable third party inspection company. Each product has been checked,put under a durability and functionality test before shipped to you. NO COMPROMISE on quality! This simple-yet-unparalled award winning tool is used by everyone from stay at home moms to various professionals. Don’t forget to buy this as a PERFECT GIFT for your family & friends.
A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.
Visually, a very sharp knife has an edge that is too small to see with the eye; it may even be hard or impossible to focus in a microscope. The shape near the edge can be highlighted by rotating the knife and watching changes in reflection. Nicks and rolled edges can also be seen, as the rolled edge provides a reflective surface, while a properly straightened edge will be invisible when viewed head-on.
using an appropriate blade for the task – a thinner blade for more delicate work, and a thicker blade whenever a thinner blade is not required (e.g. a thinner blade might be used to cut fillets, butterfly steak or roast for stuffing, or perform Mukimono, while a thicker one might be used to slice or chop repeatedly, separate primal cuts of poultry or small game, or scrape and trim fat from meat or hide, as these actions would be more likely to cause unnecessary wear on a thinner blade.)
The SunrisePro Knife Sharpener is designed to make your cutting life easy. This USA-made and patented knife sharpener, features a striking red theme and an unusual design. It has an advanced grinding system, which allows you to sharpen different types of knives. This 100% original knife sharpener, also comes with a powerful suction cup. It is quick and easy to use. This SunrisePro Knife Sharpener review, tells you everything that you need to know about this product.
To sharpen a blade in the Brød & Taylor, you situate the blade tip-down between the sharpener’s spring-loaded arms, press down slightly, and draw the length of the blade through the carbides. Within three or four passes, they remove metal shavings (pictured below) and produce a new, keen edge. You have to hold the blade steady throughout, but the tension that the spring-loaded arms put on the blade makes this task much easier. To hone, you tilt the tip upward and make six to eight passes. Then, to produce a final polished edge, you spread the arms to their widest point with your other hand and draw the blade through horizontally, allowing its weight to provide the only downward pressure. The whole process is simple to master and quick to accomplish—less than a minute.
It’s up to you if you want to use a sharpening steel or a handheld knife sharpener for honing your knives. The handheld is really easy to use. For fast, effective sharpening, simply place the blade in the slot and gently pull it through a few times. If you want to use a sharpening steel, just make sure it has a higher hardness factor than the knife to be sharpened. One more important thing: don’t ever hone serrated knives. They must be sharpened by a professional or replaced. Period.
Let's begin by sharpening the knife from the front side. Western knives are not evenly double-beveled. The ratio for sharpening them is 80% on the front side and 20% on the back side of the blade. (The angle of the blade to the sharpening stone surface is about 10 degrees.) All knives are sharpened from the cutting edge to the spine of the blade. You hold the handle with your right hand, push down on the side of the blade with the fingers of your left hand, and sharpen by moving the blade toward the center of the stone.
Its main disadvantage is cost: At about $120, the flagship stainless steel Professional model sits in an uncomfortable middle ground between our main pick and our upgrade pick. That said, an otherwise identical Classic model made of black plastic is generally closer to the price of our main pick. A lesser point, but an important one, is that this design is not completely foolproof, as our other picks are. You have to pay attention and use a steady hand and pressure to get a straight edge. Not hard—but you may need a little practice to master the process.
If you’re a serious home chef, we recommend the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV Sharpener. (And we’re not alone: It’s the top pick for Cook’s Illustrated as well.) This model is much more expensive than our top pick, but it produces a professional-quality, polished and honed edge, as opposed to the ProntoPro 4643’s “toothy” edge. “Polished and honed” means it’s inherently sharp: The Trizor XV brings the metal of the blade to an infinitesimally fine point rather than to the relatively coarse edge that our main pick produces. That means you can chop straight down through, say, onions and carrots rather than stroking through them as with a saw. And that makes for faster, more efficient knife work—as long as you possess the knife skills to take advantage. But the Trizor XV is a bit bulky (about the size of a loaf of homemade bread) and heavy, so you’ll need to find space for it under your countertop.
I have had 20 different knife sharpeners in the past, including two that are the motorized type, as well as the manual stones, and the types that clamps are used to sharpen knifes. I have some nice and expensive knives I use in the kitchen as well for recreational use. This one is by far the best one to use for the kitchen. I have not tried it any Swiss Army knife type blades, but it does very well with my Victorinox kitchen knives. I highly recommend this sharpener. It is rather large but I actually like the fact that it is large as you can then hold it better. Also, try not to push the knife down on the sharpener, but instead use a steady motion, with minimal pressure and you will see small particles sharpened off. The knob above has presets for kitchen as well as hunting knives. This sharpener is well worth its price as the sharpening blades are easily removable. The pictures don't show it well but once you pull out the knob, the gray plastic cover easily comes off and the blades are held by the yellow pieces by screws. I have not yet found replacements but I don't think I will need them soon. The blades are still sharp after sharpening 20 knives. I sharpened my main santoku knife, chefs knifes and serrated steak knives and I was very impressed. Highly recommended.
Looking at the performance, it is hard to find a sharpening stone on the market that performs better than this one. This one is simply irreplaceable. Furthermore, using this stone is a straightforward process. You just sprinkle some water on the surface and then push and pull your blade across. After a few strokes, your knife is sharp and ready. In addition, it doesn’t require too much water consumption. You don’t have to stop every now and then to sprinkle water.
An extremely well written and informative article on sharpening. Overtime we all get to love certain stones for our sharpening needs. I am a huge coticule fan, and although i have used all the others, i always come back to this natural stone above all others. Still trying to figure if i chose it or it chose me! NEver the less there are so many options out there it is not hard with a little time and effort to find the right combination for your needs.
I purchased this set together with the 400/1000 grit stone assuming that some of my knives were quite dull and would need work on a coarse grit stone. Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000 | Knife Sharpener Waterstone with NonSlip Rubber Base & Flattening Stone. This is my first wetstone. First off I tried to sharpen my Chicago Cutlery boning knife. This knife is nearly thirty years old, has been abused in may ways and was quite dull. It was very difficult for me to get a burr on this blade, which I attribute to poor technique. Next I moved on to my Henckels Professional S paring and chef's knives. The paring knife was moderately sharp and was modestly improved after working over all three grits of stone. It would cut paper but again it was difficult to develop a burr with this blade. Undaunted I switched to the chef's knife. This knife is twenty years old and has never been professionally re-sharpened. I have sharpened it twice with a Lanksey sharpening system which marred the finish but did put a good edge on the blade. Lansky Standard Coarse Sharpening System with Fine Hones. The chef's knife was moderately dull and had several pits visible on the cutting surface. I modified my technique for passing the knife over the stone and worked the chef's knife over the 400 grit stone aggressively and eventually I was able to get a burr to form from the tip of the knife all the way to the handle. From there it was a simple process of reforming the burr on the 1000 grit stone and then finishing on the 6000. After sharpening, the chef's knife easily and cleanly slices a tomato with very light pressure and is in my opinion very sharp. Not sushi knife sharp but more than enough for the chopping and slicing I expect of it. I'm looking forward to going back and working both the boning knife and the paring knife over again. Don't expect a good result from this product the first time you use it. Watch videos on using a wetstone, expect to spend at least twenty minutes per knife at first, and practice forming a burr. If you can form a burr, you will be able to successfully sharpen your knife.
Oil Stones differ from water stones in that they require the use of honing oil to float the swarf (metal particles). Also, these stones are commonly made from one of three different materials consisting of Novaculite, Aluminum Oxide (Corundum), or Silicon Carbide (Carborundum) and they all use oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf in order to prevent the stone from becoming clogged. Also, while Novaculite and Coticule are the most traditional types of oil stones, there are also synthetic oil stones made by the Norton abrasives company called “India Oil Stones”.
The type and size of the blade being sharpened determines the size of the stone needed. In general , a 6" stone is considered a small sharpening stone, an 8" stone is a common larger size, and a stone larger than 8" (10"-12" are available) is considered generously sized. Stones smaller than 6" (3" and 4" stones are quite common), are considered pocket stones and can be used for toolboxes, tackle boxes and on-the-go sharpening, but are generally not recommended for regular sharpening jobs.
The ProntoPro 4643 easily took a top-quality Mac paring knife made of very hard forged Japanese steel from badly dulled to paper-slicing sharp. Initially the knife struggled to slice through the paper and ultimately tore out; after sharpening, it swept through like a razor. And the ProntoPro 4643 was able to sharpen the blade to within ⅜ inch from the handle—that’s excellent compared with many competitors. For each knife, the whole process took about 60 seconds, and the padded handle and level base offered a secure, stable, confidence-inspiring grip.
Although it is slightly expensive than other tool sharpeners, this one saves you quite some precious time. It is one of the fastest ways to get all your blades sharpened. In addition, you just need to spend a few hours with it, and you will learn its entire operational procedure. Avoid excessive sharpening, since it might leave scratches on the blade’s surface.
For this guide, we limited our focus to manual and electric sharpeners. Such models are by far the most popular choices for sharpening knives, and for good reason. When well-designed, manual and electric sharpeners are effective, extremely quick and easy to use, and durable. (By the same token, when poorly designed they’re cumbersome, flimsy, and ruinous to blades.)

The Brød & Taylor Pocket Knife Sharpener (which is no longer available) uses the same carbide stones as the full-size model noted above, and it sharpens and hones just as well. It would make a solid, pocketable tool for campers, hunters, and anglers. But this compact model is not stable enough for long or heavy kitchen knives, and you can’t engage the spring-loaded arms in order to use a polishing function.
But it's a different type of sharp, according to Joe Authbert, product development manager at ProCook. "What it does is add tiny little micro-serrations onto the edge of the blade." But fear not - your smart knife won't end up looking like a bread knife, as you'll be hard-pressed to spot the serrations. "If you looked at it under a microscope, on the cutting edge, there are these little lines that generate the sharpness, rather than a waterstone which is a smooth sharp edge," says Authbert. 

The Adjustable Angle Pull-Thru Knife Sharpener offers new, innovative features never used on a manual knife sharpener and functional performance unmatched by standard edge maintenance products. This sharpener offers two stages of sharpening (COARSE and FINE) for all types of straight edge knives with a grind on both sides of the blade and a fixed-angle slot for sharpening serrated edge blades. It will sharpen a wide variety of knives by simply adjusting the angle of the abrasive components to match the angle of the original factory grind. Just turn the dial to one of the 6 angles offered, then pull your knife through the appropriate slot(s). It?s that easy! Stop messing with those difficult to use, cumbersome, and timely Precision Sharpening Kits and get an Adjustable Angle Pull-Thru Knife Sharpener from Smith?s®.
Some of the videos I watched suggested soaking the stone for 12-15 minutes prior to use. One suggested using vegetable oil on the surface versus water/soaking (I used water and presoaking it for 15-minutes). So instead of a simple 'out-of-the-box-and-use' approach, it required a bit of research before sharpening a knife. Otherwise I would have given this product a 5-star rating.
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