The knives sharpening system is multifunctional. It has three slots for ceramic knives, dull metal knives and a slot for finishing and polishing the edges. It is very safe to use. Hence, no need to worry about accidents or to damage your blades in the process of sharpening. The base is non-slip in nature due to the heavy duty non-slip rubber used. This provides extra grip thus boosting its safety. The main body is light and yet durable at the same time.
A sharpening stone is made of particles of abrasive material that are sintered or bonded together. The blade is moved across the stone and the steel is worn away, which creates the edge. However, at the same time, the stone is also worn away to reveal new, coarse particles. As a general rule, the softer the stone, the more rapidly it will wear and will be more aggressive in use. Harder stones don’t wear as quickly.

I really like this stone. The 1000/4000 grit combination is perfect for my needs. I'm a woodturner, and belong to a club that brings in professional turners from around the world. One had an eye opening test of sharpness. He stacked around 25 new razor blades in a box with one open side. The box assured that the blades were in perfect alignment. If you looked at the blades' sharp ends head on, all you saw was black. His point was that if you can see the edge, the blade is not sharp. Any reflection from the edge, again, facing it head on, is a dull spot. My long story leads to the fact that I was able to sharpen several knives to the point of not seeing the edge. This is not the stone to use if you are trying to remove nicks from a blade. A lower grit will do that job. This is for putting a fine, "invisible" edge on the blade, and with the right technique, that's what it will do. Another thing to consider is the fact that these stones are "sacrificial" A stone wears because it is deliberately giving up dull surface particles to expose the sharp ones below them. Anyone expecting a stone to last forever is mistaken. Bottom line? I think this is a great stone that takes my knives to the level of sharpness I need in both woodworking and cooking. I also like the rubber frame it sits in, giving you much better control over the stone. Your efforts can go into sharpening without having to steady the stone on your workbench or countertop.

It’s up to you if you want to use a sharpening steel or a handheld knife sharpener for honing your knives. The handheld is really easy to use. For fast, effective sharpening, simply place the blade in the slot and gently pull it through a few times. If you want to use a sharpening steel, just make sure it has a higher hardness factor than the knife to be sharpened. One more important thing: don’t ever hone serrated knives. They must be sharpened by a professional or replaced. Period.


I bought this knife sharpener for my son as a Christmas present years ago and recently (but cautiously) used it on my cutlery (Henkel and Wusthof). Frankly, I had been a little lazy and let my knifes lose a bit of their edge. I did not feel like getting out my stones and oil to do a proper job, so I borrowed my son's sharpener. It really works great, which I hate to admit, as it feels like a cheat and it is a fraction of what I spent on stones. I realize that I need to buy one for myself, so I looked around to see if there is anything better and I could not see anything that looked better. This one is adjustable, which is what I need. I looked at the 1 star ratings and there was a common theme that the knife edge chatters as the blade is pulled across. It can, if you don't use it properly! If your blade is very dull, you will need to pull with a very light, steady, and quick motion. You never need to push down hard as you pull. Even pressure. Don't be a brute! Finesse is what is needed. I am going to buy another one for me.
Chefs and meat cutters frequently pause and “steel” their cutting edges. Steeling doesn’t sharpen an edge; it straightens it. That’s necessary because the thin edge actually bends or warps while you’re cutting. If you could see the edge under a microscope, it would look wavy, and it would feel dull while cutting. Steeling the knife straightens out all those waves to restore a straight, even cutting edge. So when your knife begins to seem dull, don’t sharpen it—steel it first. Every time you grab a knife for the first time to begin cutting, steel it before you even get started. But it’s important to do it right or you’ll just make the edge worse. And don’t act like one of the Iron Chefs on TV and do it all up in the air—you’ll eventually wind up in the ER. Rest the end of the steel on a cutting board and do your steeling the safer and more accurate way. It’s very important that you steel at an angle between 20 and 30 degrees. Photo 1 shows you how to figure that out.

I have had 20 different knife sharpeners in the past, including two that are the motorized type, as well as the manual stones, and the types that clamps are used to sharpen knifes. I have some nice and expensive knives I use in the kitchen as well for recreational use. This one is by far the best one to use for the kitchen. I have not tried it any Swiss Army knife type blades, but it does very well with my Victorinox kitchen knives. I highly recommend this sharpener. It is rather large but I actually like the fact that it is large as you can then hold it better. Also, try not to push the knife down on the sharpener, but instead use a steady motion, with minimal pressure and you will see small particles sharpened off. The knob above has presets for kitchen as well as hunting knives. This sharpener is well worth its price as the sharpening blades are easily removable. The pictures don't show it well but once you pull out the knob, the gray plastic cover easily comes off and the blades are held by the yellow pieces by screws. I have not yet found replacements but I don't think I will need them soon. The blades are still sharp after sharpening 20 knives. I sharpened my main santoku knife, chefs knifes and serrated steak knives and I was very impressed. Highly recommended.
Works well. Just got it today, sharpened two pocket knives, one a 8Cr13MoV Chinese steel, the other s30v American steel The stone made short work of both steels (which were pretty sharp already). But notably was able to make the s30v hair shaving sharp easily, something I've had trouble with. Inexpensive and useful, I love this stone. It's not the Ninja sharp 8000+ grits that you can find, but for pocket knives and EDC, it's perfect and inexpensive. Get One!!!!!!!!!!!!
The Chef’s Choice 120 sharpener features three stages of sharpening. You can easily select between rough grit, fine grit, or honing. Rough grit is best for those extremely dull blades that will not cut through anything whatsoever, or blades which have been damaged and pitted. You can choose to follow that stage with the second and third stages or skip right to the third. Personally, I find it isn’t necessary to use every stage every time – that only chews up your blade faster, causing it to shrink.
It does its job in two stages, one for sharpening and the other one for honing. This delivers sharper knives that stay sharp for a long time. The diamond abrasive guarantee the user faster manual sharpening. The knife sharpener is compact in its design thus easy to store. It comes at a very economical price making it the go-to product on the market. It can work on your kitchen knives, pocket knives, and even santoku.
Keep your knife razor-sharp with a high-quality sharpening stone. We offer a wide variety of sharpening stones, such as Arkansas stone, Diamond stone, Bench stone, Water stone and more. Whether you own a pocket knife, a hunting knife or a kitchen knife, a sharpening stone is essential for preventing your blade from becoming dull.  Most of our sharpening stones are lightweight and portable, so you can use them at home or take them with you wherever you go.
The SunrisePro Knife Sharpener is designed to make your cutting life easy. This USA-made and patented knife sharpener, features a striking red theme and an unusual design. It has an advanced grinding system, which allows you to sharpen different types of knives. This 100% original knife sharpener, also comes with a powerful suction cup. It is quick and easy to use. This SunrisePro Knife Sharpener review, tells you everything that you need to know about this product.
Trying to decide which type of knife sharpener will work best for you in the battle of manual vs electric knife sharpener? It’s not an easy battle, since there are so many different types, methods, versions, brands bombarding you with options. One thing is for sure though, using sharp knives in the kitchen is imperative. Continuing to use dull blades when cutting and chopping can cause more than just frustration, it can cause injury. Thus, it’s important to figure this out. Just what type of knife sharpener should you buy? The question usually comes down to manual vs electric knife sharpener.
There are many methods to sharpen your knives. For example, you can use a sharppening stone, or a sharpening rod, sharpening system or an electrical sharpening machine. You can also ask someone else to do the job. The best sharpening method for you, depends on the kind of knives you want to sharpen, the type of steel of the blade, your experience with sharpening and your own preferences.
Medium Grit Stones: The number range here is from 1000 to 3000, with the latter being the basic, go-to sharpening stone. If your knives have lost their edge and need a good sharpen, then this is the grit you should start with. Don’t use it too often or the knife wears down rapidly. If you like to sharpen regularly, then the 2000 and 3000 grit are the ideal choice as they are less coarse, but please remember they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining the edge.
The truth is that there is no one recommendation that we can make that will meet everyone’s needs. Every sharpener’s needs are different and every sharpening toolkit will be different. In order to help beginning sharpeners get started with good sharpening stones to build around, we need to understand their individual needs. So with that in mind, let’s look at the basic needs of a beginning sharpener.

As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.
Aluminum-Oxide oil stones are very popular man-made sharpening stones produced by an abrasives company called Norton and which are commonly called India Stones. Generally less expensive than Arkansas stones (aka Novaculite), these stones are graded coarse, medium, and fine and are designed for fast cutting. Yet, when the fine grit is used, they can also produce a relatively fine edge. Also, because India Oil Stones are both softer and coarser than Arkansas Stones, they are commonly used in conjunction with Novaculite to cut the initial edge bevels or, repair extremely dull or damaged edges before refining and polishing the bevel with an Arkansas Stone.
A: For many years there was a heated debate around this topic with manufacturer’s stating flatly the notion their products actually damaged knives was absurd, and many professional chefs claiming not only was it not absurd, it was common for mechanical sharpeners to damage expensive cutlery. So who was right? To a certain extent they both were. The manufacturers were correct in asserting that if you followed the instructions to the letter there was little if any chance your knives would be damaged. However, in reality few people actually followed the instructions to the letter and when they veered from the recommended course the potential was there for damage.
Begin by sharpening the knife from the front side. Sharpening is completed when the knife has an even burr. Only use a flat-surfaced stone to finish the back surface of the blade. Sharpen the blade from the edge to the spine. Do not sharpen at too great an angle between the blade and the stone. The stone used to finish the cutting edge of the blade should contact the edge evenly.
Aluminum-Oxide oil stones are very popular man-made sharpening stones produced by an abrasives company called Norton and which are commonly called India Stones. Generally less expensive than Arkansas stones (aka Novaculite), these stones are graded coarse, medium, and fine and are designed for fast cutting. Yet, when the fine grit is used, they can also produce a relatively fine edge. Also, because India Oil Stones are both softer and coarser than Arkansas Stones, they are commonly used in conjunction with Novaculite to cut the initial edge bevels or, repair extremely dull or damaged edges before refining and polishing the bevel with an Arkansas Stone.

It features an ergonomic and stylish design, as well as durable construction. When it comes to knife sharpeners, it is hard to come across that combination. In addition, it comes with a 2-stage sharpening system, which allows you to polish your knives to the desired sharpness. Its ergonomic design also ensures maximum comfort, when you are using it. It has a non-slip cushion at the bottom, which provides a stable base while the ergonomic handle gives you an easy and comfortable grip.
Based in Lancaster, PA, WebstaurantStore is the largest online restaurant supply store serving food service professionals and individual customers worldwide. With thousands of available products and over 5.5 million orders shipped, we have everything your business needs to function at its best. Over the years we have expanded our selection of wholesale supplies and commercial equipment to include healthcare, educational, and hotel supplies.
On the other hand, the surfaces of knives that have been looked after may blacken a little, but this is a different type of iron oxide than ordinary reddish rust. This black oxidation is mainly triiron tetraoxide (Fe3O4). It coats the surface of the metal and prevents ordinary rust from getting in. It will not discolor food and poses no threat to hygiene.

Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 
Read on in the slides below to learn why the Chef's Choice Trizor XV is our top knife sharpener pick and why you should also consider the Brod & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener, the Edge Pro Apex 4, the Smith's TRI-6 Arkansas TRI-HONE Sharpening System, the Work Sharp Culinary M3 Manual Kitchen Knife Sharpener, the Smith's Edge Pro Adjustable, the Work Sharp WSKTS Knife & Tool Sharpener, the Linkyo Electric Knife Sharpener, and the Chef's Choice ProntoPro 4643 sharpener.

Siliciclastic stone is a clastic, noncarbonate, sedimentary stone that is almost exclusively silica-bearing and exists as either a form of quartz or, another silicate mineral. In addition, hardened clay is also a sedimentary stone but, it is formed from organic materials such as plant and animal matter and thus, it is much softer than Siliciclastic However, when silicon sediment is suspended in a clay matrix and then naturally hardened over thousands of years, it forms an excellent whetstone material; although, it is somewhat softer than Novaculite. Thus, because the geology of Japan once held large deposits of this type of stone it has been used for hundreds of years for sharpening tools, knives, and swords. However, unlike Novaculite, Belgian Blue, and Coticule, both natural and synthetic Japanese whetstones use water for lubrication and thus, they are commonly known as “Japanese Water Stones” because this type of stone is very porous. Thus, natural Japanese Water Stones must be soaked in water for up to twenty-four hours prior to use whereas, synthetic Japanese Water Stones can be soaked for only a few moments.


One of the most well-regarded natural whetstones is the yellow-gray "Belgian Coticule", which has been legendary for the edge it can give to blades since Roman times, and has been quarried for centuries from the Ardennes. The slightly coarser and more plentiful "Belgian Blue" whetstone is found naturally with the yellow coticule in adjacent strata; hence two-sided whetstones are available, with a naturally occurring seam between the yellow and blue layers. These are highly prized for their natural elegance and beauty, and for providing both a fast-cutting surface for establishing a bevel and a finer surface for refining it. This stone is considered one of the finest for sharpening straight razors.[citation needed]
In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
The newly designed dual-sided combination whetstone from Fallkniven features a super fine white ceramic stone (0, 1 micron) with a grit of 1400 to 2000 and the dark grey ceramic stone is made of synthetic sapphires (1 micron) and has a grit of 800-1000. There is no need to add any oil or water, just lay the blade on the stone, raise the blade's spine and deburr your blade on the grey side until it has a razor-sharp edge and then use the smooth white side to get a nice polished edge.
Cutlery is essential to the operation of every commercial kitchen, so it is important to know the best techniques for kitchen knife handling and safety. Proper knife training can help minimize the risk of personal injury and keep your kitchen running smoothly. If you are just beginning to learn or simply need to brush up on your approach, keep reading for some helpful knife safety tips. 1. A Sharp Knife Is a Safer Knife When you use a dull knife to cut, you need to apply more force. As a result, the knife is more likely to slip and increases the risk of injury. Keeping your knives sharpened is one of the easiest ways to keep them safe. Simply use a sharpening stone or knife sharpener to maintain the original precision of the blade. If your

I enjoy these stones so much that the feedback is not a deterrent at all for me, I don’t even think about it. The results are always nothing but top notch, they deliver exactly what I want, some of the sharpest knives I have ever produced were sharpened on Shapton Glass stones. They may be thinner but they last a very long time, they are easy to maintain as well,
The Priority Chef Knife Sharpener is versatile, safe and easy to use. This professional knife sharpener is designed in such a way that it’s easy to use. You don’t have to be a seasoned chef or meat handler, to know how to sharpen your knife with this product. You simply position your blunt blade on the sharpening slot and then enjoy a razor sharp edge in just a matter of seconds. There are no risks or safety issues involved when using this knife. In addition to that, it can be used in all blade types, including the hard steel blades, which are of high quality.
We offer a series of oilstone packages that combine India and Arkansas stones and are very reasonably priced. At 8" long by 2" wide these stones are not as wide as some other types, but still wide enough for many edges and are plenty wide for knife sharpeners. Available in four price levels, these kits are a great opportunity for the beginning sharpener on a budget.

The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
For a more affordable version (around $50), our best buy is the Chef’s Choice 250 Diamond Knife Sharpener. There are many of its consumers whom converted from manual sharpener (steel or stone) to using this electric knife sharpener. And they’re glad they did! Some of them just thought that they may not be that good in using manual sharpeners because when they used the Chef’s Choice 250 electric knife sharpener, their kitchen knives are a lot sharper than they were. They also find this electric sharpener to be great for fixing very dull blades.
Some of the videos I watched suggested soaking the stone for 12-15 minutes prior to use. One suggested using vegetable oil on the surface versus water/soaking (I used water and presoaking it for 15-minutes). So instead of a simple 'out-of-the-box-and-use' approach, it required a bit of research before sharpening a knife. Otherwise I would have given this product a 5-star rating.
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