The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.
This wedge ends up short of a "point" to a much larger degree than the picture would indicate. The metal stops short, but then there is black non-slide "tape" applied to one side, and white "slide" tape applied to the other side, which makes the wedge even thicker than it appears in the photo, which means that in practice the end of wedge is even more truncated. So I have a hard time supporting my knives accurately on this wedge while sliding them down into contact with my stones. Prior to buying this wedge I just used a wooden wedge I cut off of a 3" by 3" post using a miter saw, said wedgewhich has a much less truncated end. That wooden wedge unfortunately absorbs water from my Japanese Waterstones. But I will try spraying polyurethane on that wooden wedge to help waterproof itand try again. If that doesn't work I will try to find a 3" by 3" plastic trim board somewhere and cut a wedge off the end of that. Note that you can buy 20 degree plastic wedges, but this is the first one I have found that does 15 degrees (nominal.) Note that Amazon also has the Blue AngleGuide set of wedges, but they are very small https://www.amazon.com/Angle-Guides-Sharpening-Knife-Stone/dp/B01N4QMO7U/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1499301705&sr=8-4&keywords=sharpening+angle+guide
The AccuSharp Sharpener is proof positive that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. While it looks like something used to attach buttons to shirts it’s actually one of the most cost effective, and we mean effective, means around for restoring a professional edge to your dull knives. It’s compact, screwed together rather than glued and its diamond coated tungsten carbide wheels create an edge that will last.
A diamond plate is a steel plate, sometimes mounted on a plastic or resin base, coated with diamond grit, an abrasive that will grind metal. When they are mounted they are sometimes known as diamond stones.[12] The plate may have a series of holes cut in it that capture the swarf cast off as grinding takes place, and cuts costs by reducing the amount of abrasive surface area on each plate. Diamond plates can serve many purposes including sharpening steel tools, and for maintaining the flatness of man-made waterstones, which can become grooved or hollowed in use. Truing (flattening a stone whose shape has been changed as it wears away) is widely considered essential to the sharpening process but some hand sharpening techniques utilise the high points of a non-true stone. As the only part of a diamond plate to wear away is a very thin coating of grit and adhesive, and in a good diamond plate this wear is minimal due to diamond's hardness, a diamond plate retains its flatness. Rubbing the diamond plate on a whetstone to true (flatten) the whetstone is a modern alternative to more traditional truing methods.[13]
Over the course of two days I re-sharpened nearly a dozen old blades, including removing the secondary bevel on an old stainless Ontario saber-grind Navy diver's knife, convexing the edge on flat ground 1095 Schrade 55 that also came with a secondary bevel, and fixing a broken tip on an old Kershaw folder. These stones made quick work of the Schrade and Kershaw. Both had completely new edge geometry within 30 minutes apiece. The Kershaw looked like-new, as if the tip had never broken. And the Schrade cut much better than it's secondary bevel would previously allow, regardless of how sharp I got it with a ceramic rod and strops. The Ontario took a little more work, as it had been abused a little the last time I'd held it, over 25 years ago and was as dull as a case knife - one of the reasons I decided to go ahead and do a full saber grind - well, a slightly convexed saber, I suppose would be more accurate. But within under an hour of using the two stones and a couple leather strops (one with black compound, another with green), the Ontario was shaving sharp again too.
A great sharpener for all your kitchen knives the CS2 also makes a smart addition to the gear when you’re going away on a family camping trip. It will also do a bang-up job on your hunting, pocket, boning knife and more. As mentioned it does require just a bit of getting used to in order to achieve optimal results but nothing too involved. A simple, effective, no-frills sharpener.
Grit choices should fall in line with the steel used to make the knives you plan to sharpen. If your knives are all European, relatively soft steel knives, then you could finish off your knives at the 1,000 – 2,000 grit level. There is a lengthy explanation regarding this topic but suffice it to say that at 2,000 grit, these knives can be made extremely sharp.
This is a great sharpener for budget conscious cooks. You can use it with equal facility whether you’re right or left handed, it has a convenient finger guard to cut down on accidents and most important, it only takes a few swipes on a regular basis to keep your knives in tip-top condition. It’s not glamorous. It won’t add anything substantive to your kitchen decor. But it will ensure your knives are always ready for whatever dish you have in mind.
Now to finish: Again with P1 pressure, trailing strokes only, this time lift the blade off the stone as you finish pushing it over the stone away from you, bring it back and repeat this 5 times, on each side. The burr should be gone and your knife will be sharp, remember, manage your expectations but if you have followed this, that knife is going to be sharper than when you started and this is just the beginning. Now you can test your knife for sharpness trying to cut some telephone book paper.
"How do I use this daunting metal rod?" I hear you ask. Well, it's not too hard, really. The best way for a beginner is to balance the steel on a surface with the tip secured by a damp tea towel. You want to get that angle right, whether it's around 15 degrees for a Japanese knife or 20 degrees on a German or French blade. Then swipe slowly down, away from you, making sure the whole blade is honed – around five swipes on each side should do. 
It helps you get the knack for a consistently correct angle BUT the idea falls apart a bit when it comes to the curve and taper part of the knife and if your knife has an excessively narrow (slicer/boner) or wide (cleaver) width. It will also mark up the sides of your knife which may bother some who are obsessed with the cosmetic appearance of their $150+ Japanese knives--I could care less.
An important but often confusing area of sharpening is knowing when you're done with one stone and ready for the next finer grit. On coarse stones it is very easy. When you sharpen one side you will notice a burr forming on the opposite side of the edge. This burr is hard to see but is easy to feel. Very carefully feel for the burr by gently running your hand from the spine to the edge. (Do not run your finger along the knife edge from heel to tip, that's only asking for trouble!) A burr is formed when your stone removes material directly at the edge. The burr will move from one side of your knife to another as you alternate sharpening sides. Make sure you have felt the burr jump between both sides before you move on to the next finer stone. That will ensure that you have sharpened both sides effectively. The finer grits are done the same way but the burr is much smaller. On the finest grits you may not be able to notice the burr at all. Testing the knife sharpness will tell you when you're done. (Learn how you can test to see if your knife is sharp.)
If your dull knives are no longer getting the job done or you're worried you'll cut yourself, you should sharpen your knives with a stone. Sharpening stones, also called whetstones, are made of natural or synthetic materials and they can be used dry, with oil, or with water. Once you've chosen a stone, simply run your dull blades over the stone until they're sharp again. If you've used an even hand, your knives will feel like new!
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The following are my personal favourites and they are all synthetic stones, I do have experience with natural what stones but lets keep it simple, lets stick to synthetic water stones. Believe me, some of the world sharpest knives are sharpened solely on synthetic stones. Here are my personal favourites, I use these water stones every day and the order is not necessarily in priority, they are all good.
if you have regular kitchen knives it will not work- first its to deep and the blade does not stick out, not dinner knives but cooking knives. of all the knives i put in it only 1 was wide enough to stick out. the device does not hold the blades. all the blades tested fell out of it, even a hunting knife, maybe its for 1 type of knife and they are selling it as the must have tool for all.. that said sell something useless for a few bucks that most cant use, they got a few bucks that most will blow off and not worry about a refund.. DONT WASTE YOUR MONEY.

You will be given access to our useful online learning material: a set of videos and articles to help you improve your sharpening technique. These resources were made by professional knife sharpeners, specifically for beginners and intermediate sharpeners. The articles and videos will guide you and teach you knife sharpening from scratch, also covering more advanced techniques. You can also get in touch with us anytime if you have any questions concerning sharpening specific types knives.
Technically, the name whetstone can be applied to any form of sharpening stone, regardless of what cutting fluid is typically used with it. However because whet sounds like wet, many hear the word and assume that it refers to a stone that is used wet with water. Actually, water stones, oil stones diamond stones and ceramic stones are all forms of whetstones. So, while all water stones are whetstones, not all whetstones are water stones.
The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.
The type and size of the blade being sharpened determines the size of the stone needed. In general , a 6" stone is considered a small sharpening stone, an 8" stone is a common larger size, and a stone larger than 8" (10"-12" are available) is considered generously sized. Stones smaller than 6" (3" and 4" stones are quite common), are considered pocket stones and can be used for toolboxes, tackle boxes and on-the-go sharpening, but are generally not recommended for regular sharpening jobs.
In most cases, the sharper, the better. The sharpness of your edge is determined by the angle (the lower the angle, the sharper the edge) and how fine of a grit you choose for your final honing. Since you have already determined your angle many steps earlier, now you just need to know which grit you can stop at. This again depends on the use of the knife. In most cases, go all the way to the finest stone that you own as this will give you your best edge. The only exception would be a knife used to cut soft vegetables like tomatoes, as a slightly more coarse edge will provide more of a tooth pattern for easier cutting.

You will be given access to our useful online learning material: a set of videos and articles to help you improve your sharpening technique. These resources were made by professional knife sharpeners, specifically for beginners and intermediate sharpeners. The articles and videos will guide you and teach you knife sharpening from scratch, also covering more advanced techniques. You can also get in touch with us anytime if you have any questions concerning sharpening specific types knives.
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